Skip to main content

Full text of "California Garden, Vol. 74, No.6, November-December 1983"

See other formats


ornia 



NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1983 

Seventy- five Cents 

VOLUME 74 NO. 6 
ISSN 0008-1 116 



A 



I 



1 



* 






r* 









HORTICULTURE CALENDAR 



Nov 3, 10, 17 THURSDAY WORKSHOP 

san diego floral event Free Floral Crafts Instruction - Open to the Public 

San Diego Floral Association Garden Center, Balboa Park, San Diego 
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. - Info: Colleen Winchell 479-6433 

Nov 5, 6 SAN DIEGO TROPICAL FISH 13TH ANNUAL AQUARIUM SHOW 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 
Sat: Noon to 7:00 p.m. Sun: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Free 

Nov 7 & 14 FLOWER ARRANGING WITH ADRIENNE 

san diego floral event Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. - Info: Mrs. Hoyt 296-2757 

Nov 19,20 SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY ANNUAL FALL MINI-SHOW 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 
Sat: Noon to 4:30 p.m. Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free 

Nov 27 EIGHTH ANNUAL SUMI-E PAINTING & IKEBANA ARRANGEMENT SHOW 

Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 
Sun: 11 :00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free 

Dec 1, 2, 3, 4 SOUTH COAST BOTANIC GARDENS ANNUAL SHOW 

"Holidays in the Garden" & "A Holiday Fairytale" 
Music, Entertainment, Demonstrations, Boutiques 
26300 Crenshaw Blvd., Palos Verdes Peninsula, Calif. 
Thurs: Noon to 4:00 p.m. Fri, Sat, Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Adm. $1.50 

Dec 1 (Preview) SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SHOW 

Dec 2, 3, 4 (Public Shows) Theme: "Christmas Carousel" 

san diego floral event Majorca Room, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego 

Thurs: Preview for Floral members and guests 

Fri. & Sat: 11 :00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Sun: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Free 

Dec 2, 3 BALBOA PARK'S SIXTH ANNUAL "CHRISTMAS ON THE PRADO" 

Sponsored by the Cultural Institutions of Balboa Park (San Diego) 
Fri. & Sat: 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. Free - or reduced admissions 
Fri: High School Chorale Competitions (Organ Pavilion) 
Sat: Band Entertainment (Organ Pavilion) 

Dec 4 "CHRISTMAS IN FLOWERLAND" AND BAZAAR 

Quail Botanical Gardens, Ecke Family Bldg., 230 Quail Gardens Dr., Encinitas, Calif. 
Sun: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Free 

Dec6 LA JOLLA GARDEN CLUB HOLIDAYTEA 

La Jolla Woman's Club, 715 Silverado St., La Jolla, Calif. 
Tues: 1:00 p.m. Donation: $2.50 



162 CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




Published by 

San Diego Floral Association 

for 74 years. 



PUBLICATION STAFF 



EDITOR 

Allethe Macdonald 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Skipper Cope 
Barbara Jones 
Dewey Thaisz 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 

Robert O. Brooks 

CONSULTING EDITOR 

Dr. Donald P. Watson, Prof. Emeritus 
Dept. of Horticulture, Univ. of Hawaii 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

Carol Green tree 
Bill Gunther 
Sharon Siegan 
Allison Voss 



DEPARTMENT 

Advertising 

Circulation 

Historical 

Horticulture 

Proof Reading 

Vegetables 



EDITORS 

Penny Bunker 
Penny Bunker 
Ethel Hoyt 
George James 
Linda Pre 1 1 
Rosalie Garcia 



Manuscripts are invited. All manuscripts 
and illustrations submitted will be handled 
carefully but we cannot assume responsibility 
for their safety. All submissions must be 
accompanied by return postage. Hortus 
Third is the authority for all botanical names 
used in this magazine. All opinions expressed 
are those of the authors and do not neces- 
sarily reflect the views of the editors or the 
San Diego Floral Association. Address all 
editorial communications to: California 
Garden, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San 
Diego, CA 92101. 



© California Garden (USPS 084-020) , a non- 
profit publication, is published bi-monthly 
by the San Diego Floral Association, Inc., a 
non-profit horticultural organization. Sub- 
scriptions are $4.00 for one year, $7.50 for 
two years. Entered as second-class matter, 
December 8, 1910, at the Post Office in San 
Diego, California, under the Act of March 
3, 1879. 



SINCE 1909 



California 

GARDEN 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NO. ISSN 0008-11 16 



San Diego Floral Association & Garden Center 

Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101 
Monday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 
(619) 232-5762 

NOVEMBER —DECEMBER 1983 
VOLUME 74 



NUMBER 6 



CONTENTS 



165 
167 
168 



AN EXPEDITION TO COLLECT LETTUCE -PART II 

Thomas W. Whitaker & R. Provvidenti 

IN SEARCH OF A CALIFORNIA CHRISTMAS TREE 

Donald Betts 

MANDARIN GOLD 



1 69 KNOW YOUR ONIONS 

Rosalie Garcia 

171 DORMANT PLANT CARE 

Dewey deButts Thaisz 

175 ADA PERRY 



176 
179 
181 
183 
185 
187 
190 



AN OLD FASHIONED GARDEN 

Bill Gunther 

NUTMEG-THE HOLIDAY SPICE 

A lie th e Macdo nald 

THREE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WILD ONIONS 



50 YEARS AGO 



BOOK REVIEWS 



Carol Green tree 



Sharon Siegan 



NOW IS THE TIME 



Penny Bunker 



YEAR END INDEX 



COVER: AN AIRBRUSH HOLIDAY DESIGN BY ILSESCHEER. ILSE HAS 
CONTRIBUTED MANY ARTISTICALLY PLEASING DRAWINGS TO CALI- 
FORNIA GARDEN MAGAZINE FOR OVER NINE YEARS. 

I.CALIFORNIA GARDEN Magazine 1 [a] 084020 2. Sept. 27, 1983 3. Bi-monthly 3[a] 
Six 3[b] $4.00 4. San Diego Floral Assoc, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101 
5. (Same as 4.) 6. San Diego Floral Assoc, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101; 
Allethe Macdonald, 3933 St. James PI., San Diego, CA 92103 7. San Diego Floral Assoc, Inc. 
(Corp), Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101 8. None 9. Not changed 10[a] 
3033 3100 10[b-1] 173 74 10[b-2] 2495 2523 10[c] 2668 2597 10[d] 135 141 10[e] 
2803 2738 10[M] 230 362 10[f-2] NA 10[g] 3033 3100 J,^ ^^^^ 



POSTMASTER: SEND FORM 3579 TO: 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN, CASA DEL PRADO, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



163 



Jke S^an <JJ)ieao ^ylorai ^Maociation and L/ardcn L^entei 



Under the sponsorship of the Park & Recreation Department, City of San Diego 



OFFICERS 



President 

Mrs. Harley Cope (459-7688) 

6608 Avenida Bizarro 

La Jolla, CA 92037 

First Vice President 
Mrs. Vera Rauch 

Second Vice President 
Mrs. B. B. Puddy 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Harry McAllister 

Corresponding Secretary 
Mrs. Mary A. Boykins 

Recording Secretary 
Mrs. William E.Walker 

Past President 
Mrs. Louis J. Kulot 

DIRECTORS 

Term 1980-1983 

Mrs. H. O. Nelson 

Mrs. John Pasek 

Mrs. William Rathmann 

Term 1981-1984 
Mrs. William F. Green 

Mr. Jan Prell 
Mrs. David Westheim 

Term 1982-1985 

Mr. Walter E. Bunker 

Mr. Bill Gunther 

Mr. Bev Puddy 

HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS 

Ethel Hoyt 

Samuel Hamill 

Mary Marston 

Margaret Baldwin 



FLOWER ARRANGERS GUILD 
Pres: Mrs. John Farleigh (295-5404) 
2217 Whitman St, San Diego 92103 
1st Thurs, Casa del Prado, 9:00 a.m. 

AFFILIATE MEMBERS 

ALFRED D. ROBINSON BRANCH, 

AMERICAN BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Pres: Mrs. George Bauhan (459-9024) 
5630 Bellevue Ave., La Jolla 92037 
2nd Tues.Home of Members, 10:30 a.m. 

AMERICAN BAMBOO SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Richard A. Haubrich (481-9869) 
1101 San Leon Ct, Solana Beach 92075 

BALBOA PARK AFRICAN VIOLET SOCIETY 
Pres: Mrs. Diane Wilken (697-2884) 
7428 Rowena St, San Diego 921 19 
4th Mon,Casa del Prado,7:30 p.m. 

BERNARDO GARDENERS' CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. A. Dean Enyeart (485-8739) 
11457 Aliento Ct, San Diego 92127 
3rd Thurs, Gendale S8iL, 1 :30 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY 
Pres: Mrs. Jeanne Hawkins (436-2805) 
1678 Falcon Hill Ct, Cardiff 92007 
4th Wed, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

CARLSBAD GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Anne Clarke (753-7424) 
3308 Azahar PI, Carlsbad 92008 
1st Fri,Carlsbad Community Center 
3096 Harding St,Carlsbad,1 :30 p.m. 

CHULA VISTA GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. William Hedenkamp (422-2978) 
515 Second Ave, Chula Vista 92010 
3rd Wed,Rohr Park Manor,Sweetwater Rd, 
Bonita, 1:00 p.m. 



CONVAIR GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Virginia Soderberg (582-7098) 
6197 Arno Dr, San Diego 92120 
1st Wed, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

CROWN GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. H. B. West (435-1673) 

1514 Maria PI, Coronado 921 18 

4th Thurs,Coronado Library ,9:00 a.m. 

EXOTIC PLANT SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. Ben Hardy (448-0659) 

9443 E. Heaney Cir, Santee 92071 

3rd Wed,1235 Avocado,EICajon,7 :30p.m. 

FALLBROOK GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mr. William A. Morgan (733-0248) 
2559 Via Milpas, Fallbrook 92028 
Last Thurs ea mo except 3rd Thurs Oct, 
Nov,Dec,St. Peter's Church, 10:00 a.m. 

FLEURS DE LEAGUE, LA JOLLA 

Pres: Mrs. Louis W. Mack, Jr. (454-7890) 

P.O. Box 2251, La Jolla 92037 

2nd Mon, Home of Members, 10:30 a.m. 

HEARTLAND AFRICAN VIOLET SOCIETY 
Pres: Gwen Frankhouser (442-4993) 
1592 Murray Ave, El Cajon 92020 
2nd Tue,Wells Park, 1153 E. Madison Ave, 
El Cajon, 7:00 p.m. 

IKEBANA INTERNATIONAL,CHAPTER 119 
Pres: Mrs. Robert Meredith (270-5795) 
5343 Soledad Mountain Rd,San Diego 92109 
4th Wed, Casa del Prado, 10:00 a.m. 

LA JOLLA GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Robert Boynton (481-0263) 

376 Bellaire St, Del Mar 92014 

3rd Tues,LaJolla Woman's Club, 1:30 p.m. 

LAS JARDINERAS 

Pres: Mrs. Stoddard Martin (454-4883) 
7538 Caminito Avola, La Jolla 92037 
3rd Mon,Home of Members, 10:00 a.m. 

OHARA SCHOOL OF IKEBANA, LA JOLLA 
Pres: Mrs. Rose N. Itano (457-4626) 
8588 Prestwick Dr, La Jolla 92037 

OHARA SCHOOL OF IKEBANA, SAN DIEGO 
Pres: Mrs. Walter Bourland (276-4667) 
2936 Havasupai, San Diego 921 17 

ORGANIC GARDENING CLUB 
Pres: Mr. Will Kinney (724-2163) 
217 Escondido Ave, Vista 92083 
3rd Fri, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

PALOMAR CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 
Pres: Mrs. Eleanore Hewitt (753-3651) 
1725 Caliban Dr, Encinitas 92024 

PALOMAR DISTRICT.CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

CLUB, INC. 

Dir: Mrs. Edwin R. Gould (475-8996) 
2111 Rachael Ave, San Diego 92139 

POINT LOMA GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. L. L. Cottingham (222-4616) 
735 Cordova St, San Diego 92107 
2nd Wed,Westminister Presbyterian Church 
Talbot & Cannon, 10:00 a.m. 

POWAY VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 
Pres: Mrs. Hoyt Jeter (485-0694) 
17459 Tarn O'Shanter Dr, Poway 92064 
2nd Wed, Hally's Garden Room 
13519 Poway Rd, Poway, 9:00 a.m. 

SAN CARLOS GARDEN CLUB 

Pres: Mrs. Rhea Sands (465-3661) 

5405 Baltimore Dr, No. 9, La Mesa 92041 

4th Tue, Home of Members, 9:30 a.m. 

SAN DIEGO BONSAI CLUB, INC. 

Pres: Mr. Robert C. May (286-8423) 
7553 Clear Sky Rd, San Diego 92120 
2nd Sun, Casa del Prado, 1 :00 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO BOTANICAL GARDEN 

FOUNDATION, INC. 

Pres: Mr. Harry C. Haelsig (582-0536) 
4750 - 55th St., San Diego 92115 

SAN DIEGO BROMELlAD SOCIETY 
Pres: Mrs. Jennie Wisley (469-9151) 
8454 El Paso, La Mesa 92041 
1st Thurs, Byzantine Catholic Church, 
2235 Galahad Rd.Serra Mesa, 8:00 p.m. 



SAN DIEGO CACTUS 8. SUCCULENT SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Frank Thrombley (487-5544) 
16333 Roca Dr, San Diego 92128 
2nd Sat, Casa del Prado, 1 :30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO CAMELLIA SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. John Nichols (435-4971) 
1026 Flora Ave, Coronado 921 18 
3rd Wed, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY BRANCH, 

NATIONAL FUCHSIA SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Tony Klein (436-0997) 
1335 Walnut View Dr, Encinitas 92024 
2nd Thurs ,So.Oceanside Elm.School,8:pm 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY DAHLIA SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Martin Walsh (277-5165) 
4077 Mt. Everest Blvd, San Diego 921 1 1 
4th Tue, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERB SOCIETY 
Pres: Mrs. Betty Stroot (745-9568) 
1230 Via Rancho Parkway,Escondido 92025 
2nd Sat, Home of Members, 1 1 :00 a.m. 
(No meetings in July and August) 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. John Walters (286-1976) 
6005 Wenrich Dr, San Diego 92120 
1st Tue, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO DAYTIME AFRICAN VIOLETSOC. 
Pres: Mr. Leonard King (298-3754) 
3327 - 28th St, San Diego 92104 
2nd Mon, Fellowship Hall, Christ United 
Methodist Church,3295 Meade, 12 Noon 

SAN DIEGO EPIPHYLLUM SOCIETY 
Pres: Mrs. Elinor Latimer <697-4100) 
5990 Lake Murray Blvd, La Mesa 92041 
2nd Wed, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO FERN SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. John F. Dunlap (282-4033) 
2401 Capitan Ave, San Diego 92104 
3rd Thurs, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO FUCHSIA & SHADE PLANT CLUB 
Pres: Mrs. Eugene Cooper (295-7938) 
4444 Arista Dr, San Diego 92103 
2nd Mon, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO GERANIUM SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. George Plaisted (583-9551) 
6356 Delbarton St, San Diego 92120 
2nd Tue, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO GESNERIAD SOCIETY 
Pres: Erica Specht (270-8594) 
3860 Hiawatha Way, San Diego 921 17 
1st Thurs, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SAN DIEGO-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRISSOC. 
Pres: Mrs. Archie Owen (753-7648) 
227 Peckham PI, Encinitas 92024 
3rd Sun, Glendale Federal S&L, 
740 Lomas Santa Fe,Solana Beach, 1 :00p.m. 

SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 

Pres: Mr. G. E. (Bud) Faber (222-2272) 
4607 Orchard Ave, San Diego 92107 
3rd Mon, Casa del Prado, 7:30 p.m. 

SOUTHWEST GROUP, JUDGES COUNCIL 
Chair: Mrs. Benjamin Berry (435-2562) 
471 Country Club Lane, Coronado 92118 
1st Wed, Casa del Prado, 10:00 a.m. 

SOUTHWEST HEMEROCALLIS SOCIETY 
Pres: Mr. Lawrence Smith (748-3383) 
13634 Cynthia Lane, Poway 92064 
1st Sat, Feb-Apr-Jun-Sep-Nov, 10:00 a.m. 
Glendale Federal Savings & Loan 
740 Lomas Santa Fe, Solana Beach 

VILLAGE GARDEN CLUB OF LA JOLLA 
Pres: Mrs. Lynn Boze (455-5405) 
8287 Caminito Maritimo,La Jolla 92037 
4th Thurs, La Jolla United Methodist 
6063 La Jolla Blvd, La Jolla, 1:00 p.m. 

PROFESSIONAL DIVISION 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN, 

SAN DIEGO CHAPTER 

Pres: Mr. Walter Anderson, Jr. (224-8271) 
3642 Enterprise St, San Diego 92110 



164 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



AN EXPEDITION TD COLLECT LETTUCE 



THOMAS W. WHITAKER & R. PROVVIDENTI 



THIS IS THE SECOND PART OF A SERIES OF THREE 
ARTICLES. PART III WILL APPEAR IN THE JAN-FEB 1984 
ISSUE. 



SOVIET UNION 



1 

to 



Uj 
Uj 



PART II 
•TURKEY 

We arrived in Ankara, Turkey, on June 7 and 
spent the next three days going through the more or 
less meaningless diplomatic and political routines that 
are a necessary part of the collector's burden before 
he can actually take to the field for serious work. 
Ankara, the capitol, is a new, modern city with broad 
avenues, an abundance of trees, fine parks, numerous 
mosques, etc. 

After three days in Ankara, we moved on to 
the port city of Izmir (formerly Smyrna), which was 
to be headquarters during the remainder of our so- 
journ in Turkey. The Regional Agricultural Institute 
of the Turkish Government is located at Menemen, a 
suburb of Izmir. The Director, Dr. Kafiz Temiz, has 
established an important Seed Bank at this location. 
He is very interested in preserving the native crop 
materials of Turkey before they are destroyed, in- 
advertently, by the relentless activities of man. Within 
the borders of the country there is a wealth of in- 
digenous materials of such crops as cereals, several 
vegetables, and the narcotics tobacco and opium 
poppy. It is well worth the effort and expense to 
preserve these materials for the use of future genera- 
tions of plant breeders and those interested in plant 
protection. Our future food supply may depend upon 
the collection and preservation of this indispensible 
resource. 

After two short reconnaissance trips in the 
vicinity of Izmir, we were confronted with some 
observations that influenced the focus of our work 
for the remainder of the trip. 

It was apparent that we had arrived in Turkey 
3-4 weeks before mature seed could be harvested from 
plants of wild Lactuca species. This forced us to revise 
our strategy by pointing out to our collaborators what 
and where to collect most advantageously when the 
seed matured. We can report that this plan has worked 




RAN 



SYRIA 



MEDITERRANEAN SEA 



MAP OF TURKEY; THE DOTTED LINE INDICATES THE 
ROUTE FOLLOWED BY THE COLLECTING EXPEDITION. 



well. We have received about 100 individual collections 
from our cooperators in Turkey and Greece to sup- 
plement those we made. 

After the two reconnaissance trips in the 
neighborhood of Izmir, it became abundantly clear 
that the species of Lactuca for which we were search- 
ing were clearly dependent upon the activities of man 
for their survival. In other words, they are weeds. 
Consequently, wild lettuce species occur along road- 
sides, particularly where ground has been cleared for 
construction; among other favorite habitats are vacant 
lots and waste places in cities; banks of drainage and 
irrigation canals; along the fence rows of backyard 
vegetable plots; as a weed in fields of wheat and other 
cereals; in crevices between walls and road pavement; 
in crevices of stone walls, etc. 

In addition to wild species of Lactuca, we 
made about 87 collections of so-called "land races" 
of cultivated lettuce. The cultivation of lettuce in 
Greece and Turkey is not a large operation as we know 
it in this country. On the contrary, lettuce is mostly 
cultivated by backyard gardeners in small plots. They 
share the excess production with their neighbors, or 
they take their produce to the local market for dis- 
posal. These gardeners traditionally save their own 
seed. Usually about 6 plants, but not more than 
two dozen, are allowed to bolt, and the seed harvested. 
Thus these "land races" remain highly localized and 
effectively isolated. Selection is automatic toward 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



165 



those individuals that survive drought, mature plant 
diseases, and insect pests. Theoretically, some re- 
sistant genes of value for plant breeders should emerge 
from this material. 

We collected along the Aegean and Mediter- 
ranean coasts of Turkey from Izmir to Antakya (for- 
merly Antioch) close to the Turkish-Syrian border, a 
distance of about sixteen hundred miles. The Aegean 
Coast of Turkey is marvelously scenic. The high, 
snow-covered Tarus Mountains rise abruptly out of the 
blue waters of the Tourmaline Coast. With their 
pine-covered slopes, the Tarus Mountains are a rugged- 
ly impressive sight. Where the mountains recede from 
the coast more gradually, there is a narrow strip of 
land that supports a lush agriculture of banana plan- 
tations, citrus orchards, olives, tobacco, and such 
vegetable crops as tomatoes, eggplant, watermelons, 
beans and cucumbers. 

After two days collecting in the vicinity of 
Antakya, we commenced the return journey to Izmir 
via the inland route. This route takes one across the 
stark, arid, treeless Anatolian Plain. It passes through 
the religious city of Konya with its numerous mosques, 
and the smaller cities of Nigde, Afron and Usak. 

The western perimeter of the Anatolian Plain 
supports a productive agriculture, mostly orchards of 
deciduous fruits such as cherries, apricots, and peaches, 
with some vegetables. The most interesting crop in 
this region is the opium poppy. It is grown in small 
plots, and at the time of our visit was in full flower. 
The individual plots had the appearance of being 








X* 



PURE STAND OF LACTUCA SERRIOLA (WILD LETTUCE) GROW- 
ING ALONG ROADSIDE RECENTLY CLEARED FOR CONSTRUCTION- 
TURKEY. 



T.W. WHITAKER HOLDING SEED STALK OF AN UNIDENTIFIED 
SPECIES OF LETTUCE (LACTUCA SP.l-TURKEY. 



covered with a white blanket. Some plots consisted 
of varieties with both white and purple flowers-a 
beautiful sight. It is difficult to realize that the misuse 
of the product of these handsome plants has brought 
unlimited misery to millions of people throughout the 
ages. 

Our collecting efforts in Turkey would have 
been much less fruitful had we not had the assistance 
of Mrs. Tulin Bas, a talented plant breeder, and Amed 
Achmed, driver. These people acted as guides and 
interpreters. 

Upon returning from collecting in the south 
of Turkey we spent two days at Izmir obtaining seed 
samples of cultivated lettuce from the Seed Bank at 
the Regional Agricultural Institute (Menemen), and 
arranging for the shipment of our collections to the 
Seed Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D.C. 

Dr. Whitaker is Plant Geneticist, U.S. Department of 
Agriculture and Research Associate in Biology, Uni- 
versity of California, San Diego Campus. 
Dr. Provvidenti is the Senior Plant Pathologist, New 
York Agricultural Research Station, Geneva. 



166 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



% Search o{ a California CkrUtwA 7ree 



DONALD BETTS 



Monterey pines are now so popular for Christmas 
trees, the editorial staff thought you would enjoy 
this reprint from California Garden, December, 1962. 



MANKIND, GOING BACK to the Stone Age and 
earlier, has always had a special feeling for trees. This 
feeling springs, I believe, from two sources, man's 
sense of beauty and his need for security. 

As time went on and mankind progressed from 
the primitive, trees became useful to him in many ways 
other than shelter, as fuel for cooking and to keep him 
warm, as material to build his home, in many cases as 
food itself, in the form of fruits and nuts, and some- 
times even as clothing. Food, clothing, shelter. Is it 
any wonder then that man came to regard the tree as 
his best friend? Even the sun, which he was inclined 
to turn to, often let him down. But trees were always 
there. Furthermore, he could look at them and touch 
them and get to know them intimately, which he 
never could do with the sun. So he grew to rely on 
them: they gave him something to cling to in a wild 
and meaningless world. 

It was therefore a simple and natural develop- 
ment for man to come to worship trees, to make a tree 
the residing place of the spirit of his god. For the tree 
was the center of his world, the safe quiet place in the 
storm, the remembrance of his past, the servant of his 
present, the hope of his future. It was also a thing of 
beauty which carried his eyes upward toward the sky 
and the stars and those vast spaces of heaven which 
caught his imagination and raised him so far above the 
other creatures of his world. 

Bearing all this in mind, we can see how wise 
and natural it was for the early fathers of the Christian 
church to blend the story of Jesus, the saviour of 
mankind, with the ancient legends surrounding man- 
kind's faith in trees, so that in due course there were 
born of this union that beautiful being, the Christmas 
tree. 

Down through the years almost everything has 
been used at one time or another as a Christmas tree. 
Palms and cacti, metal, plastic, tinfoil, snow and ice, 
driftwood and sea shells, and who knows what, have 
been pressed into incongruous service by lonely souls 



in distant corners of the earth wishing to celebrate 
Christmas. But undoubtedly the first choice for this 
purpose has always settled on one or another of those 
trees belonging to the group known as conifers, such 
as the fir, the spruce, the hemlock, and the pine. Of 
these, spruce and fir certainly lead in the matter of 
symmetry and so are often held up as the ideal. But 
the pine, because of its picturesqueness, makes a more 
interesting Christmas tree. Furthermore, its usefulness 
to mankind can hardly be overestimated. 

Many species of pine make magnificent timber 
trees. The resin of some furnishes turpentine, tar and 
pitch. Pine wool is made from the needles of others. 
Essential oils from the young shoots is distilled to be 
used medicinally. And the seeds of the nut pines are 
used for food and flavors. 

Considering its extreme usefulness, its striking- 
ly picturesque qualities, its hardihood and self-reliance, 
there is much to be said in favor of placing this genus 
of conifer first on the list of Christmas trees ahead of 
its more beautiful but more conventional cousins. Of 
course there are pines and pines, in fact, over six 
hundred species and varieties, ranging from the arctic 
to the equator. In almost every cooler or higher part 
of the world there is at least one species well suited to 
the particular area. The question then naturally arises, 
in our coastal areas of southern California, which is 
the most suitable pine to serve as our Christmas tree? 
In my opinion, the choice of the species is the Mon- 
terey pine, Pinus radiata. 

This beautiful tree, native in San Mateo and 
Monterey counties and other more northern regions 
in California, has been a great reforestation tree 
around the San Francisco Bay area. But it does per- 
fectly well in our region, too. It makes a very hand- 
some tree, anywhere from 40 to 100 feet tall, with 
strikingly dark green foliage and stout spreading 
branches, compact but often irregular and always 
interesting in form. It has a deep taproot, takes well 
to poor soils of a sandy or gravelly nature, is self- 
reliant and not at all fussy about food. In fact, like 
most pines, it gets along better without heavy feeding. 
And another point in its favor for San Diego: it is one 
of the best pines to plant against the sea. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



167 



I live in Encinitas, California, about a quarter 
of a mile from the ocean, down an undedicated road 
which ends abruptly above a wide lagoon. Our humpy 
dirt road is lined with Monterey pines which were 
planted there thirty to forty years ago. The road is 
wide and the pines are massive, spreading things with 
deep-fissured dark brown bark covering the thick 
trunks and heavy limbs. When the sun shines, the soft 
carpet of brown needles, spread everywhere over the 
ground, glows with an animal warmth. When there is 
mist or rain, the wide fret-work of branches overhead 
is hung with veils of raindrops. Many birds make their 
homes high up in these dark old trees, singing and 
chattering from morning till night and scattering their 
gray feathers over the brown blanket of needles below. 
Our children love to climb and snuggle into the bran- 
ches; to gather the fat cones after they have fallen and 
paint them with bright colors and hang them around 
the house. 

In heavy weather these trees stand between us 
and the blast from the sea. In the heat of summer they 
spread coolness from their branches. At all times they 
fill the air with a wholesome fragrance. 

They whisper and sigh and sing in the breeze 
and the wind, mysterious words whose meaning we 
can sense but cannot understand. And on cold 
December nights, the moon shines softly through the 
dark branches and dapples the ground with shimmer- 
ing silver. Looking upward we see the clusters of 
glistening needles standing stark against the sky. 
Distant stars seem to twinkle at the ends of the bran- 
ches. The big trees are starred with light. They stand 
still and hushed, listening, as if awaiting at this Christ- 
mas season some good thing, a sign, a voice, a star out 
of the East, a fresh vision, a new hope for the world. 

They are indeed our Christmas trees. 



Editor's note: Monterey pines have become one of the 
most popular trees planted on Christmas tree farms in 
southern California and thousands of these beauties 
are decorated each year for our Christmas. However, 
The Saratoga Horticultural Foundation, Saratoga, 
California issues a word of warning. Monterey pines 
now have pests of beetles, moths, scale, aphids, tip and 
shot moths, and mites. For that reason they advise 
California gardeners not to overplant these intriguing 
natives in their home gardens. Even though they are 
beautiful small trees for the first few years, they be- 
come huge trees when grown to maturity. 



MANDARIN GOLD 

THE 'OWARF SATSUMA, a tangerine with a sweet 
delicate flavor makes a fine addition to a garden that 
lies in the citrus belt. Thriving both along the coast 
and inland, it is rated as one of the best for this area. 
The tree tends to be small, growing to a height of 8 or 
9 feet and approximately 9 feet in diameter. The rich 
green leaves grow thick and droppage is at a minimum. 

In late autumn, through the holiday season, 
and in the first months of the year it bears a tremendous 
load of bright orange fruit, much of it in clusters 
along the green foliage. The fruit varies from small to 
large, and sometimes very large-all in the same crop. 
This tangerine peels easily, the sections separate readi- 
ly, and to find a seed in one is rare indeed. The fruit 
can be picked over a period of two to three months 
and there is usually more than a family can eat. 

One grower's experience: "I have a satsuma 
mandarin that is nine years old. It was planted near 
the coast and given frequent waterings as it grew. The 
first Christmas two dozen pieces of fruit were on the 
tree ranging in size from small to one that measured 
1 1 inches in circumference. Since then (with the 
exception of one year when the yield was low) it has 
borne bumper crops, enough for the family to eat; 
boxes, bowls, and bags of them to be given as gifts, 
and of course bags of them for the freezer. These 
tangerines can be frozen whole in their skins, a refresh- 
ing treat to be peeled and eaten frozen on a warm day." 

With its bountiful fruit during the holiday 
season when tangerines are expensive, the satsuma 
mandarin is truly "gold" in your garden. A.M. 



CULTURE 

Citrus can be planted any time of the year 
except during cold weather. All citrus needs 
enough water to keep the soil moist, but care 
must be taken not to overwater, especially trees 
planted in clay or poorly draining soil. Newly 
planted trees need frequent waterings. In soil 
with proper drainage, they need to be watered 
once a week and as often as twice a week when 
the weather is hot and dry. Since citrus roots 
grow near the surface as well as deeper, a mulch 
helps to maintain moisture. New roots grow out 
beyond the spread of the tree, so it is important 
that moisture and fertilizer are available. 

Three applications of a high nitrogen fertil- 
izer, one in late winter, another in June, and the 
last one by the first of September have proven 
effective. Follow instructions on the package 
label for the amount to apply according to the 
size of the tree. □ 



168 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



• % 



JC 



now 




our 



Q 



ntond 



ROSALIE GARCIA 



ONIONS HAVE BEEN cultivated from time immemo- 
rial, but no one knows exactly where they originated. 
It is known they were grown and eaten in Asia Minor 
and the Mediterranean countries before there were 
written records, since they are found in ancient draw- 
ings. 

They grew wild along the banks of streams and 
still do in subtropical and temperate zones all over the 
world. Wild ones are of the very small bunching-growth 
type and are hotter than many peppers and "smellier" 
than garlic, as we learned when children. We roamed 
the woods in early spring with cold biscuits and a 
piece of hard cheese looking for the first wild onions 
to eat with them. I would always eat anything and I 
liked those wild hot onions, but some of my school 
friends couldn't eat them because they were either too 
hot, or they made them sick. 

When I came home from one of these foraging 
parties, dirty and smelling to high heaven, my grand- 
mother would say, "Rosalie you will never grow up to 
be a lady if you keep eating those smelly onions. " 
According to her code of etiquette no lady ever ate 
onions, and she never did. These wild onions were the 
bane of my mother too, when the cows munched 
them in early spring and made the milk taste so terrible 
it was unfit to drink, but the pigs didn't seem to mind. 

Allium cepa, the onion we eat, comes to us in 
various sizes, colors, and degrees of sweetness and 
hotness. Although it has never made the social register 
as a "company" dish, it is often on the holiday dinner 
menu in the form of small oval boiling onions. I 
remember my mother serving them at Christmas in a 
bowl of cream, real thick and yellow, which in these 
days is nothing short of sinful. This cream was skim- 




Drawing by PAT MALEY 



med off the top of the milk in a wide crock and topped 
off with a dusting of black pepper or nutmeg. That 
was a real festive dish. 

Some people like onions to be hot and "stinky," 
others prefer the juicy, mild, sweet flavors, mostly of 
European origin. Those who do not care for the over- 
powering onion or garlic often like the delicate flavors 
of their slim green blades to anoint the salad bowl. 

The common old yellow onion was developed 
from the American wild onion. It is our own— tough, 
strong, hot, durable-and appeals most to those who 
"like 'em hot." It is in our markets all year, for it is a 
good keeper, is disease resistant, and will grow just 
about anywhere. The seeds and sets are usually avail- 
able in any nursery and are good ones to start on for 
the beginning gardener. 

White ones may be either sweet or hot, but are 
mostly firm, hot, and strong in flavor. They keep well 
and are used mostly for cooking and drying. 

The European varieties are less frequently 
grown in home gardens, for they do not keep so well 
and sets are less available. We get sweet onions in our 
markets only two or three months in late summer and 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



169 



early fall. They are usually large, red, and flat. An 
elongated red or Italian onion is strong, mildly hot, 
firm, and keeps better. It comes a little later. 

One of the novelty varieties is the Egyptian, 
which does not grow bulbs under ground, but makes 
small bulblets from the bloom cluster on top of tall 
hollow spikes. They are strong, can be red or yellow, 
and are often used for pickles and novelty items. The 
plants are often grown in flower beds as ornamentals 
for the grotesque lines they make. Hobbyists like to 
use them in flower arrangements. 

Onions grown for drying should be left in the 
ground until the tops fall over and the stems become 
dry down into the bulb. After pulling they should lay 
in the sun or be hung in a dry, airy place for a week or 
two before storing. I have often laid them on the roof 
of the gardening shed or, if the nights were damp, hung 
them in bunches from the rafters. 

The white and yellow onions are most common- 
ly grown for drying. The large sweet juicy red ones do 
not dry well. 

I am sure that the tough and durable onion is 
destined to an unlimited future despite its odor, often 
fiery taste, and social stigma. But I am afraid I will 
never become a lady, according to my grandmother's 
standards. I still eat those smelly onions almost every 
day, even for breakfast when those sweet juicy red 
ones are in season. 

By Alice M. Clark 

Featuring: 

41 water colors 

25 line drawings 

San Diego horticulturists 

Southern California begonia growers 



Limited Edition 




Hard Cover, 7 1 /2 x 1 1 

Cosfs 

$25.00, plus $1.25 
For handling and 
nsurance 
Residents living 
in California add 
$1.50 sales tax 

Send orders 
with checks 
to 



San Diego Floral Association 
Casa del Prado, Balboa Park 
San Diego, CA 92101 



CULTURE 

Onions are a cool-weather plant, which 
should be planted in early fall or late sum- 
mer so they will mature before hot weather 
sets in. They are fairly slow growing and 
need time to mature. Before planting, the 
soil should be worked to a fine loose 
texture with fertilizer, such as well rotted 
manure, good potting soil, or humus mixed 
in. Onions will grow without all this, but 
they will do much better if they have plenty 
of nourishment and continuous moisture 
on the surface, for their roots are shallow. 

In southern California when we are likely 
to have our warmest days in September and 
early October, plant in a semi-shaded bed 
and transplant to rows when it is cooler. Sets 
can be planted anytime all winter long. If 
started from seeds, the tiny plants will 
come up very thick and must be handled so 
as not to damage the roots in transfer, but 
onions are tough and will grow from strag- 
gly starts. Seeds planted in late summer will 
produce a supply for transplanting for 
months. 

Sets are stronger and can be planted 
where one wants them to grow. Since they 
have a stronger start, they mature faster, 
and one can be enjoying green onions in 
less than a month. A half-barrel filled with 
good soil will furnish green onions for many 
months if a set is put in as soon as one is 
pulled out. Green onions can be sort of 
hot, if the hot varities are planted. 



FLORAL 
• Beautiful hand-signed 



ART 



• Full color fine art prints & posters 

• By the international artist Justin Coopersmith 

Send for FREE Catalog- 

COOPERSMITH STUDIOS B 

P.O. Box 6752 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91361 



Amtoxielli Brothers 

TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

2545 Capitola Road 
Santa Cruz, California 95062 

36-page Color Catalog 25 cents 



170 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



DORMANT PLANT CARE 



DEWEY DE BUTTS THAISZ 



DORMANT PLANT CARE is one of the best things 
you can do for your plants. A wide range of pests can 
be controlled while they are overwintering on your 
valued garden plants. Dormant spraying inflicts the 
least amount of stress on the host plant. When decidu- 
ous plants lose their leaves they also lose the hiding 
places for pests. Spraying at this time ensures total 
plant coverage and thus the most effective control. 

Dormant spraying is important because that is 
when most pests, depending on the organism, are 
susceptible to control. In fact, in some cases, such as 
peach leaf curl, there is no chemical control during the 
growing season and dormancy is the only season to 
effect control. 

• DORMANT CARE PRODUCTS 

The most common and the safest dormant 
application is the oil spray. Oil affects a wide variety 
of pests due to the nature of its kill. Technically oils 
are classified as a physical contact insecticide. Rather 
than poisoning them, the oil plugs the breathing open- 
ings (spiracles) of the insects, larva, or eggs that it 
touches, causing instant suffocation. However, it does 
not affect any creatures that later crawl over the treat- 
ed area. 

Dormant oil sprays are made of a petroleum 
oil that is refined and thinned to certain specifications 
for specific applications. Petroleum oils available for 
plant protection once had a variety of names (dormant, 
summer, unclassified, medium, light medium, etc.) 
that signified various physical properties and their 
degree of refinement. Today, virtually all such prod- 
ucts available to the homeowner are identical and 
can be used for either dormant or growing season ap- 
plications. Oils applied during the growing season are 
normally diluted with water to one-half the concentra- 
tion of dormant season's sprays. 

Heavy weight oils are more effective in killing 
scale, but are also more injurious to actively growing 
plants (leaf drop, dead twigs and branches, fruit drop, 
reduction of bloom and fruit set, and poorer quality 
fruit). The oil dissolves the waxy coating on plant 
leaves and buds causing water loss and damage, burn, 
or even complete desiccation of the foliage. Thus the 
safest time to spray is when deciduous plants have lost 
their leaves. A compromise of a medium weight oil 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



minimizes these effects. 

There are oil sprays registered for evergreens, 
usually of a lighter weight, that do not cause foliage 
damage. 

For dormant spray use, use miscible (mixable) 
oil at 1 to 15 or 20 dilution on deciduous plants. One to 
25 or 30 on evergreens. Summer oils, such as Volck, 
are used at 1 to 50 dilution. 

Companies that market oil sprays may combine 
their products with insecticides or fungicides (particu- 
larly lime sulfur) and give them a variety of names such 
as 4-season spray, scale and spider mite control, sulf-r- 
oil, etc. The purchaser should examine carefully the 
list of ingredients on the label to decide whether the 
product serves specific needs. 

Lime sulfur (calcium polysulfide) is an insecti- 
cidal/fungicidal compound of sulfur and calcium 
hydroxide (lime) of a deep red color, commonly used 
as a liquid, but also used dry, to control some mites 
and fungus diseases, especially peach-leaf curl and 

powdery mildews. It is rated as one of the "safe 
chemicals" by the EPA with no time limitation be- 
tween application and harvest. Usually it is restricted 
to a particular stage of pest development or time of 
season (dormancy) in order to avoid plant injury. Some 
species of plants tolerate application only in cool 
weather, others not at all. Many chemical companies 
manufacture a dormant disease/pest control that is 25 
to 28 percent lime sulfur. 

An oil spray with lime sulfur used in October 
or November will considerably reduce pear rust mite 
population for the following season. Using lime sulfur 
in a 1 to 9 dilution as a dormant spray controls pine- 
needle, juniper, and rose scales. 

Fixed copper sprays are also very effective 
fungicides and relatively safe to plants when used be- 
fore active growth begins. Fixed (inorganic) copper 
mixtures are reduced to a powdered form that is more 
usable to plants, releasing very low levels of copper so 
as not to harm the plant. Copper normally is toxic to 
plants unless used in discreet dosages or relatively in- 
soluble forms. 

Fixed copper mixtures are commonly applied 
to fruit trees during the blooming period to control 
brown rot on almonds and leaf curl and coryneum 

171 



blight on peaches; powdery mildews, rust, and cane 
and leaf spot on a wide variety of ornamentals; and 
Fairy Ring blight on dichondra lawns. Fixed copper 
is also used on fire blight on apples and pears, but with 
mixed results since fire blight is a bacteria rather than 
a fungus. 

Commercial orchardists frequently use a wet- 
table powdered copper mixture called Miller's Micro- 
cap that is very effective on peach leaf curl. The 
powder forms a suspension in water and is never 
really dissolved. These suspended particles tend to 
clog sprayers making it difficult for homeowners to 



Despite the fact that copper is an essential 
trace element to plants, some danger of accumulation 
in soils results from frequent or prolonged use. Certain 
citrus growers in Florida have experienced serious 
problems of copper toxicity after using fixed copper 
for disease control. 

• PESTS 

Dormant sprays are most effective on certain 
mites, aphids, scales, and larva that attack fruit trees, 
evergreens, roses, and some subtropical ornamentals. 
Scales are sucking insects closely related to mealybugs. 
Only the female causes plant injury. After a brief 




apply. The mixture is not readily available in San 
Diego County. 

Copper oleate is another popular dormant 
agent that is easy to apply and is readily available, 
however, it has not proved to be effective on peach 
leaf curl, said San Diego County Farm Advisor, Vincent 
Lazaneo. Bordeaux mix, a gelatinous mixture of 
copper sulfate and lime, is an effective fungicide, how- 
ever, it is too conspicuous for wide use on ornamentals. 
Bordoil is another copper fungicide mixed with an oil 
that is not as effective as a Bordeaux mix but is often 
mistaken for it. 



172 



Courtesy of the Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California. 

crawling period, an armored scale sticks her beak into 
a plant cell and remains in that spot the rest of her 
life, covering herself with a hard or waxy shell. Soft 
scales have no separate shell and may move about very 
sluggishly. Standard control is a dormant oil spray 
aimed at the crawlers and applied before plants start 
growth in spring. Oils mixed with malathion, diazinon, 
or carbaryl are even more effective. 

Spider mites are microscopic sucking insects 
whose feeding activity on leaves causes a pale speckling 
which may increase until the foliage turns brown or 
yellow or drops prematurely. Usually only webbing 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



is visible covering the mite colonies, sometimes cover- 
ing leaves and entire limbs. Some mites do not produce 
webbing. Since low humidity and dust encourage 
mites, periodic overhead irrigation will make plants 
less susceptible to damage. Dormant oil spraying mix- 
ed with the miticide Kelthane is a very effective mite 
control. 

Aphids, or plant lice, are small, soft-bodied 
sucking insects of many colors-green, pink, lavender, 
gray, black, red, yellow, brown-clustered on succulent 
new shoots, on buds, or inside curled leaves. Buds and 
flowers may be deformed. A black sooty mold may 
grow in the honeydew secreted by aphids on foliage. 
Dormant oil sprays will kill aphid colonies on branch- 
es or overwintering eggs. Malathion is a very effective 
chemical control. 

Fruittree leaf roller is a serious pest through- 
out California and occurs in a large number of orna- 
mentals and fruit and nut trees. Eggs hatch into larvae 
that feed on tender new leaves giving them a ragged 
appearance. Fruits are also attacked leaving charac- 
teristically deep bronze-colored scars with roughened 
net-like surfaces. Young fruits may fail prematurely. 
If a dormant oil spray is applied to egg masses during 
January or February, before buds open, it is an effective 
control and other sprays for leaf rollers are not needed. 

Diseases usually controlled by dormant spray- 
ing are leaf curl on peaches and coryneum blight. As 
previously noted, there is no chemical control during 
the growing season for peach leaf curl so dormant 
spraying is extremely important. This is also true for 
the coryneum blight (shot-hole) fungus because it is 
most susceptible in dormancy after leaves drop. 

•PLANTS 

Those plants most successfully treated during 
dormancy for insects include many grown by the 
home orchardist-peaches, pears, apples, almonds, 
apricots, cherries, kiwi, grapes, nectarines, plums, 
persimmons, and some berries. These are usually sprayed in 
November or December after losing their leaves and 
before buds set. Pests and fungus diseases are so 
prevalent on fruit trees that dormant oil spraying 
should be a yearly routine even if pests are not readi- 
ly apparent. 

Citrus can be sprayed in late fall and early 
winter for scale and mites, to some degree, but only if 
you see signs of them. Some oils are registered speci- 
fically for citrus use. The lightweight Volck oil may 
also be used on citrus if diluted, but never during a dry 
hot windy condition. Blood albumin is widely used as 

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



a spreader for oil sprays on citrus. 

Oils are also useful on ornamentals such as 
euonymus, holly, Japanese flowering quince, camellia, 
juniper, red cedar, lilac, oleander, pines, and especially 
roses. Finer-leaved ornamentals require an oil spray 
mixed at half strength for less foliage damage. Orna- 
mentals shouldn't be treated unless evidence of a , 
specific pest is noticeable. There is no point in stress- 
ing the plant unnecessarily. 

Winter cleanup is an important part of dormant 
care. Deciduous plants, particularly roses, should be 
stripped of all their leaves and debris raked up from 
under plants and destroyed to prevent pests from over- 
wintering in those areas. After cleanup, dormant 
sprays should be applied, making sure to cover every 
inch of the trunk, limbs, canes, and small twigs for the 
most effective control. To lessen plant stress, always 
water plants well a day before spraying and never spray 
when the temperature is below 45° F. or above 85° F. 

Renewed interest in dormant spraying, partic- 
ularly oils, is due to current concern over environ- 
mental contamination with toxic compounds, pest 
resistance to chemicals, and belief that oils are more 
selective than non-oil miticides and scalicides in use. 
Also, recent improvements in effectiveness and re- 
duced plant reaction, and improvements in application 
equipment make oils the most attractive method of 
dormant plant care. 



REFERENCES: 

Insect and Disease Management in the Home Orchard 

Leaflet 21262, Division of Agricultural Sciences, Univ. of Calif., 

October 1981. 
McCall's Garden Book 

Gretchen Fischer Harshbarger, 1967 
Leaf Curl Control in Peaches and Nectarines 

Leaflet 2613, Division of Agricultural Sciences, Univ. of Calif., 

November 1979. 
Fruittree Leafroller on Ornamentals and Fruit Trees 

Leaflet 21053, Division of Agricultural Sciences, Univ. of Calif., 

November 1978. 
Study Guide for Agricultural Pest Control Advisers on Insects, Mites, 
and Other Invertebrates and Their Control in California 

Publication 4044, Division of Agricultural Sciences, Univ. of Calif., 

April 1976 
The Pesticide Book 

George W. Ware, Univ. of Arizona, W.H. Freeman & Co., ? 'i(./-^4 

San Francisco, 1978. ,&• ^MJiftto 




173 



Xi 



I*. 



1984 PLANT 



ORIENTED U 



1 FLORIDA -Palm Beach, Miami, Key West 

Peggy Winter 2-day rare fruit meeting 3-day visiting plantings 

MARCH 23-MARCH 30 5-DAYS 

2 HAWAII -Four Island Tour 

Ernie Chew leads a plant study tour 

MAY 21-JUNE 1 14-DAYS 

3 PHILIPPINES-SINGAPORE-MALAYSIA-THAILAND with BALI, Java add-on 

Peggy Winter leads California rare fruit growers study tour 

JUNE 16-JULY 7 26-DAYS 

4 HAWAII -Four Island Tour 

Peggy Winter leads plant collecting tour for flowers & fruit lovers 

JULY 28-AUGUST 1 1 14-DAYS 

5 AFRICA -KENYA 

Ernie Chew leads a plant study tour 

AUGUST 6-AUGUST 24 16-DAYS 

6 SOUTH AFRICA 

Don Gustafson leads avocado and citrus growers study tour 

LATE FALL (dates not available) 

7 JAPAN - Garden Study Tour Featuring Fall Color 

Ernie Chew visits the most beautiful gardens in japan 

OCTOBER 7-NOVEMBER 1 19-DAYS 

INTRODUCTING OUR TOUR LEADERS - 

DON GUSTAFSON is a University of California Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor. Subtropical fruits are his 
specialty. He has traveled extensively both on loan to other governments and as a leader of study tours. He and 
his wife, Mary, have led the Avocado and Citrus Society study tours to many countries. The people who travel 
with him regularly feel that his many contacts with foreign government agriculture agents make his trips a 
unique and educational experience for all. 

ERNEST B. CHEW is the horticulturist who planned and planted most of the San Diego Zoo. Ernie has contacts 
with arboretums and botanical gardens around the world and his trips include visits to many places not open to 
the general public. Ernie is presently acting as garden editor of the San Diego Home and Garden Magazine. He 
gives garden tips on KOGO radio and operates a thriving landscape business. 

PEGGY WINTER is the newsletter editor for the California Rare Fruit Growers. She has led trips for this 
organization for many years and now that she is also working for this office, she plans every detail of each 
adventure. Her enthusiasm and her voluminous correspondence are two of her greatest assets. She does not 
just have contacts— Peggy makes friends, and these friends open up their homes and hearts to her traveling 
companions. 



3733 Avocado Blvd. 
La Mesa, CA 92041 

(619)464-7425 

PLEASE SEND ME MORE INFORMATION ON TOUR NUMBER (S) . 



MY NAME: 



MY HUSBAND/WIFE/ROOMMATE WILL BE: 

PLEASE FIND ME A ROOMMATE: DYES DnO 

MY ADDRESS IS: 

CITY : STATE : 



foil 



PHONE: 
^ZIP: 



tfMBMtfl 




ADA PERRY 
1904-1983 



BEGONIA 'ADA PERRY' IS ONE OF THREE PLANT 
CULTIVARS HONORING ADA. THE OTHER TWO ARE 
A ROSE AND A SPURIA IRIS. 



Ada Perry had a love for all plants and her knowledge 
was unlimited. Thousands of readers have enjoyed 
her knowledgeable and witty gardening articles in the 
Sunday San Diego Union for the past 22 years. She 
was editor of California Garden magazine in 1 948 and 
was a regular contributor for 10 years. She held an 
honorary life membership in the San Diego Floral 
Association. People of southern California, especially 
members of the many gardening clubs and plant 
societies, will sorely miss Ada Perry. 




ROSES OF c TESfIEia^ar fr TOB^af 

The 1984 catalog, Roses of Yesterday and Today, describes over 230 
varieties of old, rare and unusual roses dated from ancient times to today. 
Roses you will not find in any nursery. 

Send $2.00, with your name and address, for your copy of our informative 
80 page catalog. 

Roses of Yesterday and Today 
806 Brown's Valley Road 
Watsonville, CA 95076-0398 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



175 



An (§ib 3u^mmb (&nvbm 



Photos and text by 

BILL GUNTHER 



EARLY IN THIS CENTURY, when San Diego had 
about one-twentieth of its present population, the 
neighborhood immediately to the west of Balboa Park 
was THE neighborhood in which to live— if you could 
afford it. Mainly, that neighborhood was inhabited by 
bankers, who in those days were the richest people 
around: that is why the area was called Banker's Hill. 

Captain Ackerman was not a banker, but when 
he retired from the Navy he purchased a large piece of 
land on Banker's Hill for his home and garden. He 
selected a location for his future home on Curlew 
Street where is would have an unobstructed view of 
San Diego harbor and all the ships arriving and depart- 
ing. He also purchased the naturally contoured vale 
adjacent to the building site where he planned to build 
a private garden in which he could enjoy the plants, 
the birds, and the balmy weather of San Diego, which 
he evaluated as being the most ideal climate on earth. 

Realizing the magnitude of the project and the 
importance of finding a forward-looking architect to 
draft the detailed coordinated plans for his home and 




IN ANY VERY OLD GARDEN, IT IS FUN TO LOOK AT UNLABELED 
PLANTS, TO TRY TO IDENTIFY THEM, AND THEN TRY TO 
DECIDE WHETHER THEY WERE AMONG THE ORIGINAL GARDEN 
PLANTINGS OR WHETHER THEY WERE ADDED LATER. THIS 
ATTRACTIVE UNLABELED PLANT IS BEGONIA CORALLINA; IT 
PROBABLY IS FROM THE ORIGINAL PLANTINGS BECAUSE IT IS 
A SPECIES WHICH WAS BROUGHT HERE FROM BRAZIL OVER 
100 YEARS AGO. 



garden, he considered many available architects before 
making his final decision. The one he selected was 
Hazel Waterman-a woman-in an era when the popu- 
lar view was that the only proper place for a woman 
was in the home. In retrospect, he could not have 
made a better choice. 

There is convincing evidence that for the 
garden phase of the project Hazel Waterman arranged 
for another woman, the famed Kate Sessions, to pro- 
vide consulting assistance and the plant material. To- 
gether, these two women created a garden which even 
now, 71 years later, remains a pleasure to behold. 

Occasionally this garden is open to the public 
for special events such as the recent historic tour 
which was organized by the Save Our Heritage Organ- 
isation (SOHO). For those who may have an opportun- 
ity to visit this garden or those who enjoy reading 
about gardens here are some of the outstanding 
features. 

One's first impression is that of a magnificent 
white home of classic style, dramatically framed by 
beautiful massive trees. Judging from their size, these 
trees in all likelihood are the very same trees which 
were brought from Kate Session's nursery as saplings. 
As was her habit, Kate Sessions herself was probably 
there to personally oversee the placement and the 
planting of these trees. 

After seeing the front of the home, one should 
proceed around the coiner to the side street to admire 
the attractive palm growing on the north side of the 
house amidst other trees. This is the paradise palm, 
Howea forsterana, which surely came from Kate 
Session's nursery in 1912, and quite likely it is among 
the oldest and tallest specimens of that species to be 
found in southern California. But where and how did 
Kate Sessions get that palm in the first place? Nobody 
knows. The only place on earth where this palm 
grows in the wild is a tiny island near Australia. It is 
understandable that explorers or fishermen during the 



176 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 










THE CENTRAL FEATURE OF THIS PHOTO IS ONE OF THE 
OLDEST AND TALLEST SPECIMENS OF THE PALM HOWEA 
FORSTERANA IN THE SAN DIEGO AREA. IT GRACES THE 
NORTH SIDE OF THE ACKERMAN HOME. 



early years of this century would have admired that 
beautiful palm, and would have collected seeds from 
it. But those seeds, like most palm seeds, are short- 
lived to the degree that it is doubtful if any means of 
transportation then available could get them to Kate 
Session's nursery in San Diego before they lost all 
viability. Nonetheless, somehow, she did have that 
palm, and she has been credited by the late Chauncy 
Jerabeck, longtime San Diego City Horticulturist, as 
being the person who first popularized the paradise 
palm in southern California. 

The main part of the garden is in the vale be- 
hind the home, out of view from the street. Some of 
the features of the vale are a long arcade constructed 
from big wooden beams, a rose garden, a maze of 
garden walkways, huge old trees, and a covered out- 
door entertainment center (originally a large aviary). 



The original plans for the garden have long been lost, 
but evidently the arcade, the rose garden, and the trees 
are part of the original design. In the rose garden are 
some roses which might have been in the original 
planting, but there are also recently introduced hy- 
brids. 

But despite the minor changes, the big garden 
behind the big home remains essentially what Captain 
Ackerman wanted it to be— a quiet place of retreat, 
out of sight from the road, a garden to be enjoyed 
while simultaneously enjoying the most ideal climate 
on earth. 



Bill Gunther, a palm hobbyist, grows many varieties 
of palms and is co-editor of the California Newsletter 
of the Palm Society. He is a trustee of the Quail 
Botanical Gardens and has a keen interest in all facets 
of horticulture. 



You can live without beauty— 
but why should you! 



V 



VISIT SAN DIEGO'S ONLY COMBINATION 

PHALAENOPSIS ORCHID 

& 

MINIATURE ROSE 

NURSERY 

Also.... 
SELECTED VARIETIES OF LARGE FOREIGN ROSES 
(Limited Supply Available Spring '84) 



Ro*. VJorU 




inatd 



L 




^ 



1656 N. Second Street 

(between Greenfield & Pepper Dr.) 
El Cajon, CA 92021 

(619) 447-4922 

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 
(Closed Mondays) 



Mary E. Hardgrove 
Prop. 



Donald L. Hardgrove 
Hybridist 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



177 



G.S.IOHNSON ROSE NURSERY 



§1 



Rose Specialists 



c&S 



BUSHES • CLIMBERS • TREE ROSES 

BARE ROOTS IN SEASON 
IN CANS - AVAILABLE ALL YEAR 

SPRAY MATERIALS FERTILIZERS 

36 YEARS IN SAME LOCATION 

8606 Graves Ave., Santee, CA 92071 Phone: 448-6972 
(Corner Graves & Prospect) (Off Highway 67) 

Open 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays 



TROPIC WORLD, INC. 

NURSERY and GARDENS 




746-6106 
DAILY 9-5 



CACTI /SUCCULENTS 
INDOOR PLANTS 
LANDSCAPE PLANTS 
FRUIT / NUT TREES 
PROTEA / ROSES / BOOKS 



Located 5 miles north of 
Escondido, next to 1-15 
(Mtn. Meadow Exit). 





TO ALL GARDEN, PLANT 
AND FLOWER LOVERS. 

A descriptive brochure on the 10- 
volume New York Botanical Garden 

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Horticulture 

by Thomas Everett, called "the finest 
encyclopedia of horticulture ever 
produced in America." 

($52.50 per volume) 

Write to: vance allen 

GARLAND PUBLISHING 

136 MADISON AVENUE, DEPT. C 

NEW YORK, NY 10016 





SAN DIEGO'S LARGEST NURSERY FACILITY 



. . . with complete, personalized attention 
to your every garden need. 

Pbedddia NuiA&uf 
and tf-losiid 

LINDA VISTA RD. at MORENA BLVD. 
PHONE 297-4216 






Walter Andersen Hursery 

Since 1928 



Nursery Stock and Garden Supplies 
for Beautiful Gardens 



We Specialize in Indoor Plants 




Free 

GARDEN CLASSES 

9:a.m. Thurs. & Sat. 

3642 Enterprise 
San Diego, CA 92110 
224-8271 



PACIFIC 
TREE FARMS 




GRAFTING & PLANTING 
SERVICE 

Closed Tuesdays 

FRUIT •NUTS •BERRIES 

For Mild Climates 

• Stonefruit Trees - Many on Zaiger semi-dwarf 
root stock 

• Apples - Anna, Dorsett Golden, Gordon, Granny 
Smith, Mutsu, Ein Shemer 

• Citrus - 65 varieties • Florida Blueberries 

• Kiwi Fruit Vines - low & high chill 

• Persimmons - 6 varieties 

• Macadamia, Walnut, Almond, Chestnut, Pecan 

• Mango, Sopote, Banana, Litchi, Cherimoya, Papaya 

• DECOLLATE SNAILS 

4301 Lynnwood Dr., Chula Visto 92010 
(619) 422-2400 



178 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



3=*-=*= 



NUTMEG 

THE HOLIDAY SPICE 



ALLETHE MACDONALD 



NUTMEG, TO MANY people, is the most important 
spice in seasoning the festive foods of our holiday 
season. 

Perhaps you would be interested to know that nut- 
meg and mace, another important holiday spice, come 
from the same fruit. Both are produced from the tropi- 
cal nutmeg tree, Myristica fragans (Myristiceae)— the 
only example of two spices occurring in the same fruit 
naturally. 

Long poles with baskets attached are used to harvest 
the pale orange-yellow, pear-shaped fruit, borne on 
female trees. When mature it splits into two halves to 
reveal a seed covered by a vivid red, thin netlike 
membrane (aril), which fades to a light orange when 
dried. Mace comes from this dried substance. It is 
mace that makes doughnuts taste like doughnuts. 

The seeds consists of a thin hard shell enclosing a 
wrinkled kernel— the nutmeg. A gentle heat is applied 
to the seeds over a long period of time until they are 
thoroughly dry. Then the hard outer shell is cracked; 
the nutmeg is removed and ready to be sorted. The 
small and inferior ones are processed for the "oil of 
mace," used in condiments and some medicines. 

Myristica fragans is a dioecious evergreen tree 30 to 
60 feet tall with dark gray bark, willowy green branches, 
and leathery yellowish olive green glossy leaves 2 to 5 
inches long, resembling rhododendrons. Both the 
male and female trees have small pale yellow bell- 
shaped flowers. It takes about 25 years for a seedling 
tree to reach maximum production, but then it pro- 
duces for 60 years. Nutmeg trees are grown widely in 
the tropics thriving in a hot moist climate, in well 
drained soil. Commercially they are grown chiefly in 
Indonesia. 

For many years the Portuguese and then the Dutch 
were able to maintain a monopoly on nutmeg and 
mace. Eventually they lost control, seeds were spirited 
out of the islands and it is said that birds spread the 
seeds to other islands with their droppings. Apparent- 
ly Marco Polo was unaware of the nutmeg. It was one 



■a ^ « =» dd333?.66 tefceteeffeefr* 




! 

: 



it 



H 
r 



M 
U 

M 
M 
H 

n 

•* 

M 

u 

U 
H 
h 



^fcfcfcfcirfclrfcfclufcUa^-f^^^-HlFrre 



J 



NUTMEG, FROM MATTIOLI'S COMMENTAI RES, LYONS, 
FRANCE, 1579. THE NUTMEG SEEDS SHOWN IN THIS 
DRAWING HAVE BEEN REMOVED FROM THE 2-INCH- 
DIAMETER FRUIT, BUT THE NET-LIKE MEMBRANE 
USED FOR MACE IS STILL ATTACHED. 



of the last spices to reach Europe and then it was so 
expensive only royalty and the very wealthy could 
afford the exotic spice. They had silversmiths make 
fancy little graters that they carried with them to 
banquets. A whole nutmeg was passed so each guest 
could grate his own while savoring the aroma. At one 
time in England an ounce of mace cost the price of 
three sheep. Since mace brought a much higher price 
than nutmeg during the Dutch control, one high 
official in Amsterdam, who did not know his nutmegs, 
sent out an order to the islands to plant more mace 
and less nutmeg. 

There are many stories and folklore associated with 
these spices. In ancient times nutmeg was thought 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



179 



to be shaped like the brain so it was used as a medicine 
for brain disorders, eye troubles, and headaches. 

Connecticut is called the Nutmeg State. Sailors who 
saw nutmegs in the West Indies started carving wooden 
replicas and selling them to unsuspecting housewives 
in New England. 

The name nutmeg is given to other plants and fruits. 
One is the African nutmeg, Jamaica, Monodora myrist- 
ica, has aromatic seeds and are sometimes used as 
nutmeg. A conifer, Torreya calif ornica, often called 
the stinking nutmeg, grows in scattered California 
mountains regions below 4500 feet. The plumlike 
fruit is pale green with purplish markings. 

The next time you sprinkle freshly grated nutmeg on 
a cup of eggnog or dunk a doughnut remember these 
are not commonplace spices; they have a long and 
romantic past. 




COMPOST 

Compost is what remains after plant materials 
have gone through the first step of decay which great- 
ly reduces the bulk of the material without removing 
anything that is beneficial to the soil or the plants. 
Humus, the residue remaining after composting, is an 
excellent soil amendment because it is concentrated, 
the part that is of little value to the soil or the plants 
being removed by composting, yet it contains all the 
properties and nutrients necessary to improve soil. It 
is not necessary to add nitrogen when humus is added 
to the soil, but the addition of nitrogen, from com- 
mercial or organic sources of fertilizer, to the compost 
pile makes the composting quicker and more complete. 
Waste garden material, such as clippings, trimmings, 
and leaves can be composted and the process will take 
less time if the material can be cut or ground into 
small pieces. 



Your flowers 
never looked better 

showcased in Hazard Brie Planters 

Put your imagination to work . . . create beautiful garden settings 

of natural beauty and warmth with Hazard Brie. The rich texture 

and slight color variations in Hazard Brie are designed to 

capture sunlight, cast deep shadows and blend with every 

landscape. Mix 'n match Brics to create a variety of 

paving patterns. 

Patios • Planters • Walkways 
• Stepping Stones • Steps 

Hazard Shows You How 

Stop by one of our Hazard Masonry Centers, and 
let our friendly, experienced salesmen 
help you select materials to get started 
on your next home masonry project. See 
our literature displays for product 
design ideas and helpful hints on 
masonry construction. 




Your One-Stop Masonry Center 



San Diego 

Highway 163 at Friars Road • Telephone 297-4141 
El Cajon 

1155 Vernon Way • Telephone 448-7411 
Chula Vista 

491 "C" Street • Telephone 427-2062 




180 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



^Jhree S^outnern (^aiifornLa l/Uild \Ji 



niond 



Photo # 1 

Allium praecox, Wild Onion, near Jamacha. Small 
flowers are white or pinkish, with violet anthers and 
dark midveins. Seeds are black, bouncy and plentiful, 
in fat papery capsules. Commonest wild onion of 
southern California, and earliest to flower. Found 
also in Baja California. February, March, and April. 

Photo #2 

Allium campanulatum, Bell-Flowered Onion, Cuyamaca 
Peak. Flowers of light pearly pink with fat red anthers. 
A foothill and mountain onion, occurring above 2000 
feet, from San Diego north to Oregon, also western 
Nevada. May, June, and July. 

Photo #3 

Allium peninsulare, Red-Flowered Onion, Dulzura. A 
showy Allium, this one is bright rose-purple. Found 
below 3000 feet but not close to the coast. Many 
localities in San Diego County, including Ramona, 
Lakeside, Jamacha, Tecate Mt.; also from central Cali- 
fornia to Baja California. March through May. 




Photos by BETTY MACINTOSH 





NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



181 



UNDERSTANDING SOIL ANALYSIS 

E. ROBERT BICHOWSKY 

SOIL ANALYSIS IS a diagnostic tool that is useful for 
the correction and maintenance of soil productivity. 
Factors affecting plant growth may be chemical, 
physical, biological, or cultural. Chemical soil analysis 
is most useful for appraising saline and alkali condi- 
tions, determining the fertility status for nitrogen, 
phosphorus, potassium, iron, manganese, and calcium, 
and estimating the amounts of chemical soil amend- 
ments such as gypsum, needed to correct soil conditions. 
Physical analysis of soils for such things as sand, silt, 
and clay content is often useful for providing informa- 
tion concerning irrigation practices and recommending 
organic amendments. 

The pH (soil reaction) is a measure of how 
acid or how alkaline (basic) the soil is. It is measured 
on a scale of 1 to 14. Most plants do best in a range 
from 6.5 to 7.5. The availability of minerals and 
nutrients to plants is often dependent on the pH. 

The E.C. (electrical conductivity) is a measure 
of the amount of soluble salts present in the soil. An 
E.C. reading of 2.0 to 3.0 millimhos per centimeter is 
approaching a range where some salt sensitive plants 
such as dichondra and avocado will be damaged. A 
reading of 3.0 requires that the salts be washed out of 
the soil or leached out. 

The major nutrients are nitrogen, phosphorus, 
and potassium. A complete fertilizer often is recom- 
mended to supplement the nutrient levels. The minor 
nutrients include calcium, iron, and manganese. These 
nutrients are needed only in small quantities and are 
usually present in sufficient amounts. 

When gathering soil for analysis, obtain samples 
from a depth of 1 to 4 inches from three different 
areas to make a composite sample. One pint of soil is 
a sufficient amount for analysis. Soil should be dry. 
The sample you take should be representative of the 
problem for which you are testing. Sample the areas 
differing in growth, appearance of the soil, slope, 
drainage, or other factors, separately. Place sample in 
a clean and sturdy container. With the samples include 
the past history and present management practices 
and details of the problem being examined. 

There are many factors affecting a plant's 
growth. These are only a few of them. This analysis 
cannot detect such things as fungus diseases, nematodes, 
and insects. The cultural factors of plant growth such 
as drainage, exposure, temperature, and irrigation 
practices are as important to a plant's development as 



any of the above. Thus, if a problem exists, this 
analysis may not find it. It can only eliminate some 
possibilities. 



a 





TO OUR READERS- 

California Garden Magazine 



A subscription to— 




California. 

GARDEN 



* A Perfect Christmas Gift! 

*A Nice Gift to a Neighbor! 

*Great Gift to a Friend! 

*A Lovely Gift to Your Hairdresser! 



You are invited to subscribe to 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN 

or become a member of 

*J ne Oan c^Uiearo 

jf-loral ^AfssociaHon 

Fill in box with membership desired and mail with 

check to: 

SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 
Balboa Park, San Diego, CA 92101 

Classification of Memberships: 

Individual $7.50 D 

Family $8.50 □ 

Sustaining $10.00 □ 

Contributing $25.00 □ 

Magazine Only $3.00 □ 

Magazine Only (2 years) $5.00 H 

Name 



Address. 



City. 



State. 



Zip. 



182 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 











e> « 



Carol Greentree 



ayMMyMMMMMHfe! 




"A Famous Christmas Tree", December, 1932, by 
K. O. Sessions 

When the yacht Vilehi reached New Zealand 
about Christmastime, 1931, Mrs. Horton was charmed 
with the beauty of a native tree in full bloom, a 
glorious red. Unable to secure plants from the local 
nursery for shipment to her Chula Vista home, she 
wrote to me to import at least a dozen plants ... an 
order for seed to Vilmorin & Company of Paris was 
promptly filled. Letters of inquiry to Golden Gate 
Park brought two plants. An article in our CALIFOR- 
NIA GARDEN by Miss Elizabeth Fairley on New 
Zealand plants in April, 1 93 1 , tells us that this famous 
Christmas tree, the glory of New Zealand, is Metro- 
sideros tomentosa* . . further investigation has given 
the following facts: the flower is like our well-known 
bottle brush, but its color is a more brilliant red. It 
makes a tree 30 to 50 feet high but will bloom when 
only a shrub in size. It withstands the coast winds 
and ocean's spray and will grow in poor soil. 
* The correct botanical name now is: Metrosideros 
excelsus. 



"Dombeya", December, 1933, by Bertha M. Thomas 
We have a Dombeya in our yard and it is now 
a gorgeous mass of those indescribable pink balls. 
Nothing else resembles them. There are always twins, 
and occasionally one twin blooms ahead of the other. 
The leaves are large and do their best to protect their 
children, for the least little frost turns them brown. 
Even a little moisture will do the same. This year I 
cheated nature by stripping four-fifths of the leaves, 
and the flowers can now be seen. They are short-lived 
and I pick off the old brown ones every two or three 
days. The flowers are in good bloom, only about six 
weeks, but nothing on earth can excell their beauty 
or daintiness . . . Nearly every passerby stops and 
gazes with admiration. 



"Gardening in This Southland", November, 1933, by 
Peter D. Barnhart 

Climatic conditions in this land of visions and 
dreams are so congenial to members of the kingdom of 
plants that the lover of plant life never ceases to 
wonder what may be expected next, in all his experi- 
menting with things NEW . . . 

Some things NEW: Chironia floribunda* was 
recently introduced by Hugh Evans of Santa Monica. 
The flowers are rose colored, borne in great profusion 
on plants a foot high. When they become plentiful and 
cheap enough, they will make excellent borders for 
large beds. It is one of the Gentianaceae; a native of 
South Africa, from whence come a host of things that 
fit into the southern California scheme. 

. . . Bailey gives little space to Thunbergia 
gibsonii. It is an evergreen vine of wondrous beauty 
about ten months of the year. The orange flowers 
last for days after cutting. The stems are short, but if 
some of the vine is cut with the flowers, they add grace 
to any bouquet. A native of East Africa, the marvel 
is how luxuriant it is in this dry clime. It is a shy 
seeder and must be propagated from cuttings. 

Another plant of wondrous beauty is Bouvardia 
humboldtii** the only species which seems happy in 
our Southland, yet is seldom met here. Of purest 
white, and delightfully fragrant at night, no collection 
of plants should be without it. 
* The correct botanical name now is: Chironia 

palustris, subsp. transvaalensis . 
** The correct botanical name now is: Bouvardia 
longiflora 'Albatross.' 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



183 



KARTUZ GREENHOUSES 




Passiflora 
'Coral Glow 



1408 SUNSET DRIVE 
VISTA, CALIF. 92083 
Phoner (619) 941-3613 



Rare flowering plants for the home 
and garden, featuring the world's 
largest selection of begonias and 
gesneriads. Come visit us, or send 
$1.00 for our 1983 mail-order catalog. 



Open Thursdays through Sundays 
from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM; other 
days by appointment. 



(619) 448-0659 



Open weekends 1 to 5 p.m. 
Weekdays by Appointment 



Ttacdy & Jouquette OtcAuU 

WHERE YOU FIND THE UNUSUAL 
Along With The Usual 



Carlton Hills 



9443 E. Heaney Circle 
Santee, CA 92071 




DAN'S 
LANDSCAPE & PATIO PLANTS 

•EXPERIENCED NURSERYMAN • 

• FREE CONSUL TA TION 
•GARDEN PLANNING 

•SELECT PLANTS @ MODE R A TE PRICES 

• DELIVERY 
•PLANTING 



m 



DANIEL T.BANAGA 

(619) 296-7672 



j|| 




M^^^^^^^^^^l^^t^ 





Open 7 days 

8:00-5:00 
436-0928 








Select from hundreds of exotic 
palms, schefQeras, dracaenas, 
cycads and more 

Thousands of Hanging baskets and 
flowering plants, to add beauty & 
color to your yard & patio 

691 Sparta Drive • Leucadia, CA 92024 




VZS4" 



1-5 to La Costa Ave. 

East to Frontage Rd. 

South 3 blocks to Sparta 





DRIP IRRIGATION 

SALES 

• Save Water, Time, and Money! 

• Largest Selection of Drip Irrigation 
Equipment in East San Diego County. 

Y ^ *^ • Installation Assistance. 
i C\f^^\ • Design Services. 

Call or Write for Futher Information 



HR 



TRICKLE SOAK SYSTEMS 

8733 Magnolia, Ste.109 Santee, CA 92071 
449-6408 




""* ** *" **~ 



"** xv 



McDANIEL'S 
MINIATURE ROSES 




BUSH • TREE • 
CLIMBER • 
HANGING 
BASKET 



HARDY AND EVERBLOOMING 
SHIPPED ALL YEAR 



7523 ZEMCOST. 
LEMON GROVE, CA 92045 

Please Phone (619) 469-4669 



XK 



xx: 



3MC 



184 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



&J, /2 



eviewi 



Review by SHA RON SI EG AN 



New Zealand Medicinal Plants by S.G. Brooker, R.C. 
Cambie and R.C. Cooper. Published in the USA by 
The Windmill Press, Exeter, N.H., 1981. $36.95. Avail- 
able from I.S.B.S., Inc., P.O. Box 1632, Beaverton, 
OR 97075. 

Two noted chemists and a botanist, the latter 
serving for more than two decades at the Auckland 
Institute and Museum, collaborated to compile a very 
readable, handsome volume on New Zealand's medic- 
inal plants. 

Historically, Maoris (the native New Zealand- 
ers) had only modest interest in herbal cures. Their 
general good health and belief in the exorcism of evil 
spirits limited flora trials primarily to wound treatment. 
With the arrival of the Europeans, the situation 
changed, and both groups became much more experi- 
mental about their local plants. 

Inclusion in this book is based on reportage of 
a plant's medicinal use, which admittedly the authors 
cannot always authenticate. Nor do they claim 
promise of any efficacy. 

What they do offer are anecdotes on usage, 
methodology of application, along with those of 
related plants, and most importantly, the chemistry, 
particularly that which may contribute (or account 
for) reputed benefits. Plants are listed alphabetically 
by species, with family identification, common and 
Maori names noted. Since many of the plants listed 
are familiar to gardeners of all countries, this book 
will have far greater interest than its title might suggest. 
The color photos and drawings illustrating the 
medicinal plants aid in identification. 

The Camellia Story by Tom Durrant. Published in the 
USA by Windmill Press, Exeter, N.H., 1982. $47.95. 
Available from I.S.B.S. Inc., P.O. Box 1632, Beaverton, 
OR 97075. 

Tom Durrant founded the New Zealand 
Camellia Society in 1957, and spent the subsequent 
years in further collecting, cultivating, and researching 
the genus. This book is a result of his love affair with 
camellias. 

Camellia history begins with C. sinensis, the 
tea plant, and Durrant traces its ups and downs in 
international popularity, correlating it with the socio- 
economic scene. C. japonica epitomized Victorian 
society, but suffered neglect thereafter with the de- 



cline of formal gardens and greenhouses, only to 
surface again, along with the lesser known reticulatas, 
when home owners became serious gardeners. Durrant 
also projects development of a whole new color/shape 
array based on the introduction of C. chrysantha, the 
yellow camellia. 

The author cautions about nomenclature con- 
fusion, caused primarily because oriental introductions 
received different names in each of their new host 
countries, the situation being further compounded by 
the many amateur and natural crosses of closely 
related species. Anyone interested in hybridizing will 
find the detailed discussion of camellia genetic struc- 
ture of particular value. 

The Camellia Story is a coffee table book, 
beautifully illustrated with some 200 full color photo- 
graphs (primarily of New Zealand species), guaranteed 

to tempt all camellia enthusiasts. 

The Rhododendron Species -Volume, I - Lepidotes, 
by H.H. Davidian. Published in the USA by Timber 
Press (P!0 Box 1631, Beaverton, OR 97075), in co- 
operation with the Rhodendron Species Foundation, 
1982. $59.95. 

This epic work is primarily a reference, confined 
to lepidotes, or scaly barked rhododendron species. 
Azaleas, better suited to the San Diego climate, are 
elepidotes, and will be considered in a later volume. 

An update of an older classic, The Species of 
Rhodendron, this book is remarkable for its exhaus- 
tive and scholarly coverage. Following a history of 
the genus, there is a key to the lists of series and 
subseries which the publisher promises will allow 
identification "with reasonable accuracy [of] every 
species in cultivation." Ninety-five magnificent color 
photographs, along with detailed taxonomic treatment, 

aid in classification. 

After forty years spent studying rhododendrons 
at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh, the author 
has earned his international reputation as an out- 
standing authority on the genus. The book is a 
culmination of his dedication to this subject. 



Editor's note: We regret the demise of Russell P. 
Mac Fall, a retired newspaper editor, who has written 
our book review column for the past five years. 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



185 



LOOK FOR THESE TESTED PRODUCTS 



IDEAL FOR SAN DIEGO COUNTY CONDITIONS 



A DISTINCTIVE PRODUCT 




A 


=-\ 


l 

a 
» 
a 

> 
z 

S 


MILDRGANITE 


^TiriTU snuc suss 

jicT/. '' 20 

^ FM U»« 

) KICIW LOCUST* 


£■ HUM M Ml UU M 

r fi ntnuu uutn omi 
EMiatopsnnwiTuu 


THE smueVcOMBUOO 



MILQRGANITE — 
100% true organic (no 
synthetic elements), 
slow - release, non- 
burning fertilizer 
for trees, shrubs, 
turf grasses, ground 
covers and flowers. 
Easy to use, stores 
well . 



FERTI-PILLS 

The safe, long lasting fertilizer tablets used by 
professional growers, contractors, landscape 
architects and nurserymen 
The Ferti-Pill #1 - 



for 1 gallon size plants 
up to tree size 

for ground cover and 
bedding plants 

for container and house 
plants. 

Unlike Jobes or other tree spikes, these pills 
contain safe non-burning nutrients and can be 
used on our San Diego shallow soils. 



The Ferti-Pill #2 - 



The Ferti-Pill #6 



LOAM EX 

THE ULTIMATE IN SOIL 
AMENDMENTS 

L. \J r\ IVI CA is a long lasting blend of 
organic and inorganic materials. 

• MADE from finely ground fir bark, redwood 
sawdust, diatomaceous earth, iron and nitrogen. 

• WILL outlast all other amendments. 

Lv-z/ilVI lZ/\ contains humus, humic 

acids and soil bacteria to help break up heavy 

soils. 

DO NOT BE MISLEAD by amendments that are 

represented as a cure-all. You need 10% -40% 

organic amendments to change the soil texture. 




GOLD CUP . • . the newest 

development in a complete 

POTTING SOIL 



% MADE !N SAN DIEGO 

FOR OUR 

CONDITIONS. 
• IDEAL K)R CONTAINER 

GROWING OF FLOWERS, 

VEGETABLES AND 

HOUSE PLANTS 



POTTiHG 
SOIL 




Ask for GOLD CUP . . . and see the difference! 



ALL AVAILABLE AT YOUR FAVORITE NURSERY ! 




compiled by PENNY BUNKER 



NOW 

IS THE 

TIME 



A CULTURAL CALENDAR OF CARE FROM OUR AFFILIATES 



BEGONIAS MARGARET LEE 

Now is the time- 
to watch the weather; if dry, keep planting 

material moist but not wet. 
to protect potted plants if rains arrive; a heavy 

run-off can wash out soil and expose the roots, 
to control insect problems— spray for mealybugs 

and other pests, 
to spray also for mildew control— read labels and 

follow complete instructions of manufacturers, 
to feed lightly. 

to clean plants of all dead leaves and wood, 
to give plants a top dressing of your favorite 

mulch, 
to let tuberous begonias go dormant. 

BONSAI DR. HERBERT MARKOWITZ 

Now is the time- 
to watch watering schedule. Cut down on water- 
ing if a rather normal season. Watch dormant 
trees, they need more water; keep moist but 
not wet. 
to move trees to shade if a hot spell occurs. Avoid 
a second growth period during this time; it will 
weaken the trees, 
to remove old leaves, fruit, or seed pods from 

deciduous trees, 
to refrain from fertilizing or transplanting, 
to protect trees from any sudden changes of 
temperatures. 

BROMELIADS lindaprell 

Now is the time- 
to let bromeliads rest. 
to withhold fertilizer so the plants may harden 



off for winter, 
to stop watering if cold wet weather, 
to leave offshoots on the mother plant— they 

fare better in winter this way. 
to bait for snails and slugs that thrive during 

rainy season, 
to protect plants from exposure to the elements: 

frost, hail, and strong winds can do irreparable 

damage. 

CACTI & SUCCULENTS verna pasek 

Now is the time- 
to give a low nitrogen feeding, 
to watch watering— many plants are resting at 

this time; too much water will cause root 

damage, 
to make cuttings of succulents. Use the lovely 

red ones in a living wreath for Christmas, 
to make plans for protection of tender cacti and 

succulents in case of heavy rains or cooler 

weather, 
to check for insects and such pests as scale and 

mealybugs. 

CAMELLIAS SAN DIEGO CAMELLIA SOCIETY 

Now is the time- 
to feed a 2-10-10 fertilizer for better and larger 

blooms, 
to maintain a regular watering program— do not 
allow plants to dry out. Mist only in late after- 
noons on dry hot days to keep from burning 
the leaves, 
to continue disbudding. 

to pick up all old blooms to prevent petal blight, 
to maintain a regular spray program, especially 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



187 



against looper worms, 
to select new plants while in bloom, 
to renew mulch, where necessary, using either 

bark or pine needles. 

DAHLIAS ABEJANZEN 

Now is the time- 
to permit plants to go dormant by withholding 

water and fertilizer, 
to cut stalks when plants have died back and are 

brown, 
to leave tubers in the ground to harden off unless 
rains are heavy and drainage poor, then lift 
the clumps and let dry for a few hours before 
dividing and storing, 
to divide clumps. Cut the clumps apart with a 
sharp knife so each tuber has one eye (growth 
bud). Be sure to put sulphur on each cut. 
Place tubers in vermiculite, sand, or other 
medium and store out of the weather. 

EPIPHYLLUMS frank granatowski 

Now is the time- 
to withhold fertilizers, especially those contain- 
ing nitrogen (the first number in the formula, 
i.e. 4-10-8), thus allowing plant to become 
semi-dormant, 
to protect plants from exposure to the elements. 
Frost, hail, and strong wintry winds can cause 
irreparable damage. Overexposure to harsh 
winter sunlight can be as detrimental as ex- 
posure to hot summer sun. 
to transplant into larger containers those plants 

that are not expected to bloom next spring, 
to check seed pod (the apple). Ripened apples 
may be picked and the seeds planted. How- 
ever, do not rush this procedure. Germination 
of the seeds will be vastly improved when the 
apple has become fully matured, 
to take advantage of the winter rains. Even pro- 
longed rains will have no harmful effect on the 
plants if planted in good porous soil; they tend 
to leach the soil of accumulated salts. Be sure 
to collect rain water for future use. Store in 
covered opaque containers to prevent mosquito 
larvae and the buildup of algea. 
to maintain good grooming of plants. Prune out 
dead, unsightly and non-productive branches 
to conserve the plant's energy. Keep contain- 
ers free of debris, and bait for slugs and snails. 



A few granules of Slugetta placed at the base of 
the container have proved to be effective and 
leaves little or no unsightly residue. 

FERNS RAYSODOMKA 

Now is the time- 
to continue to be alert for insects-slugs and 

snails are active, 
to water if it does not rain. Check plants not 

reached by rains, 
to fertilize with a more dilute mixture, 
to plant spore, 
to protect plants at night in frost areas. Cover 

with newspapers, old sheets, or place in garage, 
to take off pups from platyceriums and mount 

them. 

FUCHSIAS WILLIAM SELBY 

Now is the time- 
to allow plants to rest after a hard blooming 

season, 
to keep plants cleaned up— remove all debris, old 

leaves, etc. Check under plants which is an 

ideal spot for insects, fungi, and mold to winter 

over, 
to protect plants from frost and cold winds in 

areas where this is required, 
to watch watering. To water enough to keep 

from drying out, if not enough rain, 
to prune plants heavily if in a frost- free area, 
to feed all plants that have been cut back with a 

balanced fertilizer. 

GERANIUMS CAROL ROLLER 

Now is the time- 
to water less often. Each watering should moisten 
the entire soil ball and excess water should 
escape through the drainage holes, 
to continue feeding with a balanced fertilizer 
dissolved in water, using it at half the recom- 
mended strength every 4th or 5th watering or 
as often as needed to keep the plants growing 
well, 
to prune plants which have not been cut back. 
Leave some green leaves on each stem being 
cut back. Prune again in 4 to 6 weeks to bring 
lanky plants into shape, 
to make cuttings from the prunings. Shelter the 

cuttings from extreme weather conditions, 
to tip pinch plants which were pruned early in 



188 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



the fall. 

to continue pest and disease control, using prod- 
ucts according to the manufacturer's directions. 

to give temporary shelter from freezing if tem- 
peratures fall below 30° F. 

to rotate plants regularly for symmetrical shape. 



before pruning. 

to dormant spray several times from late Decem- 
ber to late January. May even start some 
pruning in late December. 

to visit garden centers to purchase and plant 
bare-root specimens. The season may begin in 
late December. 



IRISES SAN DIEGO-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOCIETY 

Now is the time- 
to make final plantings of bearded types, spurias, 

Louisianas, and Siberians, 
to plant bulbs of Dutch, English, and Spanish for 

spring blooms, 
to water spurias regularly until well established, 
to clean beds of dead leaves and weeds; aphids 

winter over in neglected areas, 
to spray for aphids or give a light feeding of a 

systemic fertilizer which gets rid of all sucking 

plant pests, 
to feed tall-bearded a balanced organic-type 

food. Give Japanese and Louisianas some acid- 

type (camellia food is convenient), 
to move and replant Pacific Coast natives 

in late December when the little 

white roots are showing. Water well until they 

are established. 

ORCHIDS CHARLIE FOUQUETTE 

Now is the time- 
to clean off greenhouse glass— allow more light 

during the days with shorter daylight hours, 
to repot plants that have finished blooming, 
to check mix breakdown and renew if needed, 
to check for snails and scatter proper bait, 
to feed low nitrogen (10-30-20) fertilizer to 

cymbidiums. 
to continue light feeding on cyps and phals. Keep 

them moist, 
to feed 18-18-18 to cattleyas showing continued 

growth through root-tips and leaves, 
to stake new spikes as they appear, 
to spray or mist the variegata oncidiums in the 

morning so they will be dry by nightfall. 



VEGETABLES george james 

Now is the time- 
to set out in the garden started plants of lettuce, 
celery, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels 
sprout, and Swiss chard, 
to remember seeds of any kind will germinate 
slowly and may decay because of low temper- 
atures and wet soil, 
to prepare soil so that after the holidays you can 
plant roots of asparagus, artichoke, rhubarb, 
and plants of cane berries, strawberries, grapes, 
and deciduous fruit trees. 



GREEN THUMB suzy garden 

Now is the time- 
to plant blubs for spring color: daffodils, 

ranunculus, anemones, scilla, Dutch iris, lilies. 

Tulips and hyacinths may be planted after 

Thanksgiving. Be sure to refrigerate 4 to 6 

weeks before planting, 
to set out winter-spring annuals for continued 

garden beauty. 
to cut mums about 6 to 8 inches from the ground 

after blooming. Feed to encourage new growth 

for next year's additional plants, 
to apply dormant sprays in December to control 

pests and disease next year, 
to feed birds-of-paradise. Cut out dead growth 

from clump to improve appearance, 
to prepare and enrich your soil, preparing now for 

the bare-root planting of roses, trees, etc. in 

January, 
to prune and shape holly and pyracanthas using 

the branches for holiday decorations. 



ROSES BRIAN DONN 

Now is the time- 
to withhold water to help plants become some- 
what dormant, 
to give a dormant spraying in December even 



frapp JMttiatja 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



189 



YEAR 1983 SUBJECT INDEX 

ANNUALS 

Donahue, Lois K. 

Pansies, Sep-Oct, p. 143 
Jones, Barbara S. 

The Garden Nasturtium, Jan-Feb, p. 20-1 
May Baskets, May-Jun, p. 77 
Zinnias, Jul-Aug, p. 101-2 
Macdonald, Allethe 

Planting Time, Sep-Oct, p. 141-2 
ARRANGEMENTS 
Green, Adrienne 

Camellia Arrangements, Jan-Feb, p. 13 
Kirkpatrick, Mrs. John R. 

Arrangement, Sep-Oct, p. 153 
Siegan, Sharon 

Prolonging Cut Flowers Longevity, 
Mar-Apr, p. 45-7 
BIOGRAPHY 

Ada Perry 1904-1983, Nov-Dec, p. 175 
Mrs. John R. Kirkpatrick 1890-1983, 
Sep-Oct, p. 153 
BOOK REVIEWS 
Aaronson, Marian 

Flowers in the Modern Manner, May-Jun, 
p. 90 
Bailey, Steven 

Carnations, Mar-Apr, p. 57 
Brooker, S.G., Cambie, R.C. & Cooper, R.C. 

New Zealand Medicinal Plants, Nov-Dec,p.18 
Court, Doreen 

Succulent Flora of Southern Africa, 
May-Jun, p. 91 
Davidian, H.H. 

The Rhododendron Species, Vol. I— 
Lepidotes, Nov-Dec, p. 185 
Dawson, E. Yale 8t Foster, Michael S. 

Seashore Plants of Califomia,Sep-Oct,p.155 
Durrant, Tom 

The Camellia Story, Nov-Dec, p. 185 
Garnet, J. Ros. 

Wildflowers of Wilson's Promontory 
National Park, Mar-Apr, p. 57 
Hepper, F. Nigel (Editor) 

Kew: Gardens for Science & Pleasure, 
Jan-Feb, p. 26 
Kramer, Jack 

Everest House Complete Book of 
Gardening, May-Jun, p. 90 
Kruckeberg, Arthur R. 

Gardening With Native Plants of the 
Northwest, Sep-Oct, p. 155 
Lenz, Lee W. and Dourley, John 

California Native Trees 8t Shrubs for Gar- 
den and Environmental Use in 
Southern California, Sep-Oct, p. 136 
Mathew, Brian 

The Crocus, Sep-Oct, p. 155 
Mathias, Mildred E. (Editor) 



Garcia, Rosalie 

Herbs in Pots, Jul-Aug, p. 109-10 
Know Your Onions, Nov-Dec, p. 169-70 
New Vegetable Hybrids,Mar-Apr,p.53-5 
Siegan, Sharon 

Chrysanthemums: Imperial Flower, 
Sep-Oct, p. 138-40 
Snooks, E.C. 

Sasanquas in Hanging Baskets, Jan-Feb, p. 1 1-2 
Stubbs, Annabelle 

Fabulous Fuchsias of San Diego County, 
May-Jun, p. 74-6 
FRUITS & NUTS 

Macdonald, Allethe 

Nutmeg— The Holiday Spice, Nov-Dec, p. 179-80 
The Versatile Lemon, Jan-Feb, p. 5-8 
Voss, Allison 

Solanum Quitoense, Jul-Aug, p. 103-4 
FUCHSIAS 

Stubbs, Annabelle 

Fabulous Fuchsias of San Diego County, 
May-Jun, p. 74-6 
GARDENING, DROUGHT-RESISTANT 
Brigham, Steve 

New Australian Shrubs For Low-Water- 
Use Gardens, May-Jun, p. 84-6 
Donahue, Lois K. 

A Native San Diegan Reminisces, Jul-Aug, 
p. 108 
Macdonald, Stuart 

Rocks With Plants, May-Jun, p. 71-3 
GARDENING, SEASONAL 

Now is the Time — Compiled by Penny 
Bunker, Jan-Feb, p. 28-31; Mar-Apr, p. 
60-3; May-Jun, p. 92-5; Jul-Aug, p. 123-6; 
Sep-Oct, p. 156-8; Nov-Dec. p. 187-9 
Macdonald, Allethe 

Planting Bareroot Trees, Jan-Feb, p. 14-5 
Thaisz, Dewey de Butts 

Dormant Spraying, Nov-Dec, p. 171-3 
GARDENS, HISTORICAL 
Greentree, Carol 

Victorian Gardens Reading List, 
Jul-Aug, p. 113-4 
GARDENS, PRIVATE 
Gunther, Bill 

Old Fashioned Garden, Nov-Dec, p. 176-7 
GARDENS, PUBLIC 
Garcia, Rosalie 

The Virginia Robinson Garden, Sep-Oct, 
p. 152 
GARDEN STRUCTURES 
Bauhan, Betty 

Why A Lath House?, Mar-Apr, p. 41-2 
Robinson, Alfred D. (Reprint) 

How To Build and Use A Lath House, 
Mar-Apr, p. 43-4 
Thaisz, Dewey de Butts 

How To Build An Elegant Patio, 
Jul-Aug, p. 105-7 



Flowering Plants & Landscape,Mar-Apr,p.57 GARDENING TECHNIQUES & MAINTENANCE 



Rose, Peter Q 

Climbers 8t Wall Plants, May-Jun, p. 90 
Sharsmith, Helen K. 

Flora of the Mt. Hamilton Range of 

California, Jul-Aug, p. 126 
Victorian Gardens Reading List, 
Jul-Aug, p. 113 
Willmott, P.K. 

Scientific Greenhouse Gardening,Sep-Oct,p. 155 
BOTANICAL 

Whitaker, Thomas W. & Provvidenti, R. 

An Expedition to Collect Lettuce, Part I, 

Sep-Oct, p. 149-50 
An Expedition to Collect Lettuce,Part II, 
Nov-Dec, p. 165-6 
BROMELIADS 
Voss, Allison 

Puya Alpestris, May-Jun, p. 69-70 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN MAGAZINE 
Galloway, Anne 

The Hottes Collection,Jan-Feb, p. 22-3 
Ada Perry, 1904-1983, Nov-Dec, p. 175 
CAMELLIAS 
Snooks, E.C. 

Sasanquas in Hanging Baskets,Jan-Feb,p.11-2 
CONTAINER GARDENING 
Cope, Skipper 

Pot a Plant for Christmas, Sep-Oct,p. 144 



Macdonald, Allethe 

Three Reasons for Staking Trees, Jan-Feb, 
p. 16-9 
HERBS 

Garcia, Rosalie 

Herbs in Pots, Jul-Aug, p. 109-10 
Macdonald, Stuart 

Rocks With Plants, May-Jun, p. 71-3 
Neil, Bern 

Aromatic Herb Wreaths From the Herb 
Garden, Sep-Oct, p. 145-6 
HISTORICAL 

Donahue, Lois K. 

A Native San Diegan Reminisces,Jul-Aug, 
p. 108 
Galloway, Anne 

The Hottes Collection, Jan-Feb, p. 22-3 
James, George 

75 Years of Citrus Research,Jan-Feb,p.9-10 
Macdonald, Allethe 

Arbor Day, Mar-Apr, p. 40 
HORTICULTURE 
Brigham, Steve 

New Australian Shrubs for Low-Water-Use 
Gardens, May-Jun, p. 84-6 
Cope, Skipper 

Think Light Not Shade, Mar-Apr, p. 39 



ILLUSTRATIONS (ORIGINAL ART) 
Gladson, Carol 

Poinsettia, Mar-Apr, p. 45 
Halterman, Marjorie 

African linden blooms & leaves,Jul-Aug,p.15 
Kulot, Beverly 

Pot of chives, Jul-Aug, p. 108 
Maley, Pat 

Chrysanthemums in a bowl, Sep-Oct, Front 

Cover 
Dendrobium Jester var. 'Vickie Joy', Mar- 
Apr, p. 51 
Onions, Nov-Dec, p. 169 
Pansies, Sep-Oct, p. 143 
Puya alpestris, May-Jun, Front Cover 
Mastro, Marj 

May Basket, May-Jun, p. 77 
Scheer, Use 

Citrus limon 'Improved Meyer',Jan-Feb, 

Front Cover 
Holiday Arrangement, Nov-Dec, F. Cover 
Simmens, Susan 

Victorian Home, Jul-Aug, Front Cover 
Quade, Joyce 

Herb wreath, Sep-Oct, p. 145 
Mexican handflower tree, Chiranthoden- 
dron pentadatylon, Mar-Apr, Front Cover 
ILLUSTRATIONS (PHOTOGRAPHS) 
Gunther, Bill 

Brachycome diversifolia, rock daisy, 

May-Jun, p. 84 
Passiflora 'Coral Glow', Sep-Oct,p.133 
Thunbergia alata 'Orange Giant'; Sep- 
Oct, p. 111-2 
Quade, Robert 

Lath house, Mar-Apr, p. 141 
Thaisz, Dewey deButts 

Botanical building, Balboa Park, 
Mar-Apr, p. 43 
Voss, Allison 

Solanum quitoense, Jul-Aug, p. 103 
Floral display at 1982 Southern California 
Exposition, May-Jun, p. 88, Back Cover 
LANDSCAPING 
Brigham, Steve 

New Australian Shrubs for Low-Water- 
Use Gardens, May-Jun, p. 84-6 
Cope, Skipper 

Think Light Not Shade,Mar-Apr,p.39 
Macdonald, Stuart 

Rocks With Plants,May-Jun, p. 71-3 
NATIVE PLANTS 
Chamlee, Helen 

A Timely Publication, Sep-Oct, p. 136 
Donahue, Lois K. 

A Native San Diegan Reminisces, 
Jul-Aug, p. 108 
Macdonald, Allethe 

Planting Time, Sep-Oct, p. 141-2 
ORCHIDS 

Fouquette, Charles & Hardy, Ben 

Watering Your Orchids, Mar-Apr, p.51-2 
Hardy, Ben 

A Historic Milestone in Orchid Hybri- 
dizing, Sep-Oct, p. 137 
Orchids on Postage Stamps, Mar-Apr,p.48-50 
PESTS, INSECTS, DISEASES 
Thaisz, Dewey deButts 

Dormant Spraying, Nov-Dec, p. 171-3 
Garden Snails 8t Slugs Control,May-Jun, 
p. 81-3 
PERENNIALS 

Donahue, Lois K. 

Pansies, Sep-Oct, p. 143 
Gunther, Bill 

Oxalis Megalorrhiza, Jul-Aug, p. 116-7 
Macdonald, Allethe 

Planting Time, Sep-Oct, p. 141-2 
Siegan, Sharon 

Chrysanthemums: Imperial Flower, 
Sep-Oct, p. 138-40 
ROSES 

Streeper, Dick 

Getting Fat With Roses,Mar-Apr,p.37-8 
SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 
Galloway, Anne 

The Hottes Collection, Jan-Feb,p.22-3 
Garden Study Course, May-Jun, p. 76 
Mrs. John R. Kirkpatrick, Sep-Oct, p. 153 



190 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EXPOSITION 
Watson, Donald P. 

Horticulture at the Del Mar Fair, 
May-Jun, p. 88-9 
SHRUBS 

Brigham, Steve 

New Australian Shrubs for Low-Water- 
Use, May-Jun, p. 84-6 
SOIL 

Miller, John E. 

Gardening With Worms,Jul-Aug,p.121 
TREES, FLOWERING 
Ayres, Samuel, Jr. 

Polygala Apopetala and Thevetia 
Thevetioides, Jan-Feb, p. 24-5 
Halterman, Marjorie 

African Linden Tree, Jul-Aug, p. 115 
TREES, FRUIT 
James, George 

75 Years of Citrus Research, Jan-Feb, 
p. 9-10 
Macdonald, Allethe 

The Versatile Lemon, Jan-Feb, p. 5-8 
Voss, Allison 

Solanum Quitoense, Jul-Aug, p. 103-4 
TREES, ORNAMENTAL 
Greentree, Carol 

Acer Palmatum, Jan-Feb, p. 21 
Ginkgo Biloba, Sep-Oct, p. 134 
Halterman, Marjorie 

African Linden Tree, Jul-Aug, p. 115 
Jones, Barbara S. 

Fall Color, Sep-Oct, p. 135 
Macdonald, Allethe 

Three Reasons for Staking Trees, 
Jan-Feb, p. 16-19 
VEGETABLES 
Garcia, Rosalie 

At Their Best, May-Jun, p. 78-80 
The Classy 'Cabbages,' Broccoli and 

Brussels Sprouts, Sep-Oct, p. 147-8 
Know Your Onions, Nov-Dec, p. 169-70 
New Vegetables Hybrids,Mar-Apr,p.53-5 
Macdonald, Allethe 

Planting Time, Sep-Oct, p. 141-2 
Whitaker, Thomas W. & Provvidenti, R. 
Expedition to Collect Lettuce, Part I, 

Sep-Oct, p. 149-50 
Expedition to Collect Lettuce, Part II, 
Nov-Dec, p. 165-6 
VINES 

Brigham, Steve 

Clockvines, Jul-Aug, p. 1 1 1-2 
Brigham, Steve & Worley, Pat 

Passiflora 'Coral Glow',Sep-Oct,p.133-4 



YEAR 1983 AUTHOR INDEX 

AYRES, Samuel, Jr. 

Polygala apopetala & Thevetia Thevetioides, 
Jan-Feb, p. 24-5 
BAUHAN, Betty 

Why a Lath House?, Mar-Apr, p. 41-2 
BRIGHAM, Steve 

Clockvines, Jul-Aug, p. 111-2 

New Australian Shrubs for Low-Water- 
Use Gardens, May-Jun, p. 84-6 
BRIGHAM, Steve 8i WORLEY, Pat 

Passiflora 'Coral Glow', Sep-Oct, p. 133-4 
CHAMLEE, Helen 

A Timely Publication, Sep-Oct, p. 136 
COPE, Skipper 

Pot a Plant for Christmas, Sep-Oct, p. 144 

Think Light Not Shade, Mar-Apr, p. 39 
DONAHUE, LoisK. 

Pansies, Sep-Oct, p. 143 

A Native San Diegan Reminisces, Jul-Aug, 
p. 108 
FOUQUETTE, Charles 8. HARDY, Ben 

Watering Your Orchids, Apr-May, p. 51-2 
GALLOWAY, Anne 

The Hottes Collection, Jan-Feb, p. 22-3 



GARCIA, Rosalie 

At Their Best, May-Jun, p. 78-80 
The Classy 'Cabbages,' Broccoli and Brus- 
sels Sprouts, Sep-Oct, p. 147-8 
Herbs in Pots, Jul-Aug, p. 109-10 
Know Your Onions, Nov-Dec, p. 169-70 
New Vegetables Hybrids, Mar-Apr, p. 53-5 
The Virginia Robinson Garden,Sep-Oct p. 152 
GREEN, Adrienne 

Camellia Arrangement, Jan-Feb, p. 13 
GREENTREE, Carol 

Acer Palmatum, Jan-Feb, p. 21 
Ginkgo Biloba, Sep-Oct, p. 134 
50 Years Ago,. Mar-Apr, p. 40; May-Jun, 
p. 70; Jul-Aug, p. 1 19; Sep-Oct, p. 154; 
Nov-Dec, p. 183 
Victorian Gardens Reading List, Jul-Aug, 
p. 113-4 
GUNTHER, Bill 

An Old Fashioned Garden, Nov-Dec, p. 176-7 
Oxalis Megalorrhiza, Jul-Aug, p. 116-7 
HALTERMAN, Marjorie 

African Linden Tree, Jul-Aug, p. 115 
HARDY, Ben 

Orchids on Postage Stamps, Mar-Apr,p. 48-50 
A Historic Milestone in Orchid Hybridizing, 
Sep-Oct, p. 137 
JAMES, George 

75 Years of Citrus Research,Jan-Feb,p.9-10 
JONES, Barbara S. 

Fall Color, Sep-Oct, p. 135 
The Garden Nasturtium, Jan-Feb, p. 20-1 
May Baskets, May-Jun, p. 77 
Zinnias, Jul-Aug, p. 101-2 
MACDONALD, Allethe 

Arbor Day, Mar-Apr, p. 40 

Garden Fragrance, Jul-Aug, p. 104 

Intelligent Watering, Jul-Aug, p. 107 

Nutmeg-The Holiday Spice, Nov-Dec, p. 179-80 

Planting Bareroot Trees, Jan-Feb, p. 14-5 

Planting Time, Sep-Oct, p. 141-2 

Three Reasons for Staking Trees, Jan-Feb, 

p. 16-9 
The Versatile Lemon, Jan-Feb, p. 5-8 
MACDONALD, Stuart 

Rocks With Plants, May-Jun, p. 71-3 
MacFALL, Russell P. 

Book Reviews, Jan-Feb, p. 26; Mar-Apr, 
p. 57; May-Jun, p. 90-1; Jul-Aug, p. 126; 
Sep-Oct, p. 155 
MILLER, John 

Gardening With Worms, Jul-Aug, p. 121 
NEIL, Bern 

Aromatic Wreaths From the Herb Garden, 
Sep-Oct, p. 145-6 
SIEGAN, Sharon 

Chrysanthemums: Imperial Flower, Sep-Oct, 

p. 138-40 
Prolonging Cut Flowers Longevity, Mar-Apr, 
p. 45-7 
SNOOKS, E.C. 

Sasanquas in Hanging Baskets, Jan-Feb, p. 1 1-2 
STREEPER, Dick 

Getting Fat With Roses,Mar-Apr, p. 37-8 
STUBBS, Annabelle 

Fabulous Fuchsias of San Diego County, 
May-Jun, p. 74-6 
THAISZ, Dewey deButts 

Dormant Spraying, Nov-Dec, p. 171-3 
Garden Snails & Slug Control, May-Jun, p. 81 -3 
How to Build an Elegant Patio, Jul-Aug, 
p. 105-7 
VOSS, Allison 

Puya Alpestris, May-Jun, p. 69-70 
Solanum Quitoense, Jul-Aug, p. 103-4 
WATSON, Donald P. 

Horticulture at the Del Mar Fair, May-Jun, 
p. 88-9 
WHITAKER, Thomas W. & PROVVIDENTI. R. 
Expedition to Collect Lettuce, Part I, 

Sep-Oct, p. 149-50 
Expedition to Collect Lettuce, Part II, 
Nov-Dec, p. 165-6 
WORLEY, Pat & BRIGHAM, Steve 

Passiflora 'Coral Glow', Sep-Oct, p. 133-4 



/J|\ 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 1983 



191 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN (USPS 048-020) 
San Diego Floral Association, Inc. 
Casa del Prado, Balboa Park, 
San Diego, CA 92101 USA 



SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA 



Garoasel 



SAN DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SHOW 

December 2nd. 3rd & 4th 

MAJORCA ROOM, CASA DEL PRADO, BALBOA PARK, SAN DIEGO 
Open to the Public Commencing at 1 1 :00 a.m.